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Charles and Ray Eames's Kids Toys: As Wonderful as You'd Expect

Ray Eames standing beside The Toy, a prefab building toy for kids manufactured by Tigrett Enterprises in 1951. All images © Eames Office, LLC.
Ray Eames standing beside The Toy, a prefab building toy for kids manufactured by Tigrett Enterprises in 1951. All images © Eames Office, LLC.

A central tenant of the design philosophy of Ray and Charles Eames was an embrace of play as an end in itself, the idea that creativity should be unconstrained and unburdened. While the couple will always be remembered for their contributions to furniture, design and cinema, it was their approach to experimentation, and their interest in seemingly tangential topics such as clowns, that inspired their seemingly endless sense of wonder and a constant drive towards exploration and improvement. As champions of those beliefs, it only goes to follow that they'd also be some of the world's foremost toy designers.

In a new article posted by Herman Miller, Alexandra Lange, Curbed's architecture critic, examines the Eameses legacy of design intended for children, including playful prefab structures and boxes meant for building. It's clear from the analysis, accompanying archival images, and cool interactive toy that the duo valued playful design, and a gift for inspiring that same appreciation in others.


· Serious Fun [Herman Miller]
· 5 Things You Didn't Know About Ray and Charles Eames [Curbed]
· Unprecedented Auction of Rare Eames Furniture Pieces Coming This Fall [Curbed]
·Why The World Is Obsessed With Midcentury Modern Design [Curbed]
· Cranbrook's Golden Age: How a Freewheeling School Changed American Design [Curbed]