clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Dutch Artist Daan Roosegaarde's 'Waterlicht' Light Show Simulates a Submerged Amsterdam

Daan Roosegaarde's "Waterlicht" uses light to simulate a submerged Amsterdam, one without its tide-stymieing waterways. All photos courtesy of Studio Roosegaarde/Pim Hendriksen
Daan Roosegaarde's "Waterlicht" uses light to simulate a submerged Amsterdam, one without its tide-stymieing waterways. All photos courtesy of Studio Roosegaarde/Pim Hendriksen

Venice may be the "City of Canals," but Amsterdam, the scenic capital of the Netherlands, has also earned quite a reputation for its grittily romantic waterways. Though the Italian city is, notoriously, sinking—and fast—Amsterdam, too, is well below sea level (about 6.5 feet, to be precise) and susceptible to the same effects of climate change and ocean-rise as any metropolis near a major body of water. For three days this week, native son and local artist Daan Roosegaarde set out to help visitors to the Rijksmuseum's public plaza envision an Amsterdam submerged, simulating the effect of such a flood via an ethereal LED-light installation reminiscent of the Aurora Borealis, but far more menacing in its implications.


· Waterlicht [Studio Roosegaarde]