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One Photographer's Look at Burning Man's Incredible Pop-Up Architecture

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The Temple of Transition, by the International Arts Megacrew, at the Burning Man art festival, 2011. The structure is believed to have been the largest wooden structure, without a foundation, ever built. The Burning Man temples are memorial sites fo
The Temple of Transition, by the International Arts Megacrew, at the Burning Man art festival, 2011. The structure is believed to have been the largest wooden structure, without a foundation, ever built. The Burning Man temples are memorial sites fo

NK Guy has spent his time wandering the desert. A prolific writer and photographer who has attended the Burning Man art festival for the last 14 years, Guy has witnessed the event's settlements coalesce and collapse over and over again, like some sort of mad mandala, blocks of installations, artwork and temporary buildings creating a unique yet ephemeral cityscape. His new book, Art of Burning Man (Taschen), documents the intricate structures that forms the backdrop to this massive event in the Black Rock Desert, which draws roughly 65,000 people annually to an empty landscape 100 miles from Reno. While there may be divided opinions on the event itself, it's arguable this is one of the biggest annual collections of pop-up architecture on the planet, including massive wooden structures that are ritually torched. Ahead of the book's release this month, and the festival's kickoff this August 30, Taschen provided a gallery of some of Guy's most insane shots.



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