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Brutalist-inspired concrete house rises in Tel Aviv

Aluminum-and-weathering-steel louvers cover the floor-to-ceiling windows

The boxy structure features two stacked, cubic volumes and a series of vertical louvers made from aluminum and weathering steel that cover floor-to-ceiling windows on the facade.
The home comprises two stacked volumes.
Photos by Amit Geron via Dezeen

Architecturally speaking, Tel Aviv, Israel, is the land of Bauhaus and International Style buildings. With over 4,000 of them in the small coastal town of 400,000 people, it’s come to be known as the White City, even earning a UNESCO World Heritage designation.

It makes sense, then, that new construction in Tel Aviv is also influenced by the modernist style. Take this concrete family home, for example. Designed by local practice Bar Orian Architects, the boxy structure features two stacked, cubic volumes and a series of vertical louvers made from aluminum and weathering steel that cover floor-to-ceiling windows on the facade. The louvers can be adjusted, and each piece slides away to uncover the windows.

The architects’ idea was to create a Brutalist-inspired residence that felt raw and hefty, hence the board-formed markings on the facade and the chunky window treatments. Inside, the rooms are just as spare, with white walls and polished concrete floors. Sliding glass doors on the first floor provide for ample indoor-outdoor living opportunities.

The top floor, accessed by a concrete staircase with wooden steps, is smaller than the main floor to allow for a roof terrace on either side of the dwelling.

Via: Dezeen