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High-tech camper unfolds to reveal a 2-bedroom tiny house

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The sCarabane rotates 360 degrees to follow the sun

New campers and RVs are constantly popping onto the scene, some with game-changing modular systems and others with innovative ways to maximize space. But one of the most unique concepts we’ve seen came out of the recent Düsseldorf Caravan Salon in Germany, a trade event with an exhibit hall of futuristic campers.

France’s Green Cat Technologies unveiled the sCarabane, a giant self-sufficient camper trailer that ups the ante when it comes to green technology. When it’s traveling, the sCarabane looks like a 26-foot boxy silver mobile garage, but once you’re at camp, the trailer unfolds to reveal a spacious, 420-square-foot tiny house.

The sCarabane rests on a circular stand that allows it to rotate and move. It takes about 30 minutes to unfold a front deck and two rear bedrooms. The larger master bedroom boasts almost 80 square feet of space and a fold-out desk, while the smaller 59-square-foot bedroom can fit two twin beds. The well-equipped kitchen opens to the deck outside, and a dining table can seat six before converting into an extra sleeping area.

An adjustable bubble window features a reflective shade to control natural light and heat, and rose windows on the bedroom ceilings let you change how much sunlight streams in from above. A bathroom area comes with a toilet, sink, shower, and small washing machine.

While the amenities on the sCarabane make it competitive with other high-end campers, where the camper really shines is with its green technology. A parabolic mirror on top of the trailer tracks the sun and rotates the caravan 360 degrees for optimal sun exposure, similar to this plug-and-play solar power unit. On top, a retractable wind turbine can generate 500 watts of clean power. Solar cells provide backup power and a solar concentrator generates hot water.

According to New Atlas, Fillon Technologies began work on the sCarabane concept in 2013 before Green Cat Technologies took over its further development. There’s no word on when production might start or how much it might cost. But with all of these bells and whistlers, the sCarabane won’t come cheap.

The sCarabane in driving mode.
Courtesy of sCarabane, via New Atlas
The circular track that allows the camper to move.
Courtesy of sCarabane, via New Atlas
The front deck of the camper unfolds.
Courtesy of sCarabane, via New Atlas
The back bedroom area unfolds. You can see the two rose windows as well.
Courtesy of sCarabane, via New Atlas
A parabolic mirror fuels the water supply, while a gray and green wind turbine provides an alternative to the solar panels.
Courtesy of sCarabane, via New Atlas
The kitchen of the sCarabane.
Courtesy of sCarabane, via New Atlas
The kitchen opens to a six-person dining area.
Courtesy of sCarabane, via New Atlas
The window overlooking the deck.
Courtesy of sCarabane, via New Atlas
The dining area transforms into another bed.
Courtesy of sCarabane, via New Atlas
Looking into the master bedroom.
Courtesy of sCarabane, via New Atlas
The fold-down desk in the master bedroom.
Courtesy of sCarabane, via New Atlas
The smaller, second bedroom with the rose windows above.
Courtesy of sCarabane, via New Atlas