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Solar-powered wooden trailer is like a tiny home for your campsite

The classic teardrop trailer gets a makeover

The Timberline trailer from Homegrown Trailers.
All photos courtesy of Homegrown Trailers.

If you’re looking to camp with the whole family but don’t want to shell out serious cash for the largest luxury RV, consider a simpler solution like this wooden trailer from Homegrown Trailers.

We first reported on Homegrown Trailers back in 2016 when they were on Kickstarter and only had a prototype. Now the Seattle-based company has unveiled a larger model that could work as a camper or even as a backyard tiny home.

The Timberline’s gorgeous sustainably-sourced wooden exterior is reminiscent of the classic teardrop shape, and the camper features an inviting, large wooden door and three windows. It’s also eco-conscious. The Timberline uses recycled plastics, a composting toilet that requires no chemicals, and energy efficient lighting.

Inside, two bunkbeds and a double bed claim to offer space for six—although four people looks more feasible if you value space. A full sink, plenty of counter space, a wet bath with indoor shower and toilet, and a fridge round out the other amenities. Another option is to swap the bunkbeds with a dinette so that you have more space to eat.

While a lot of these amenities are found in other types of campers and RVs, there is something warm and inviting—and familiar to tiny home lovers—about the Timberline’s style. Maybe it’s the wood trim or small touches like built-in cabinets, but Homegrown Trailers just look like campers you could stay in for awhile.

The Timberline is available in two different trim packages: An “on-grid” package starting at $37,000 that relies on standard RV electrical outlets; or an “off-grid” package costing $41,500 that uses 600-800 watts of solar panels to power the trailer.

The trailer isn’t the lightest in its class at about 4,000 pounds of dry weight, so you’ll need a medium-size SUV or truck to haul it. But this well-built, simple design could appeal to many adventurers who are sick of sleeping on the ground.