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MoMA announces ‘Concrete Utopia’ exhibition spotlighting Yugoslavian architecture

The show will feature over 400 drawings, models, photos, and films from the former country’s leading architects

Miodrag Živković, Monument to the Battle of Sutjeska, 1965-71, Tjentište, Bosnia and Herzegovina. View of the western exposure.
Miodrag Živković, Monument to the Battle of Sutjeska, 1965-71, Tjentište, Bosnia and Herzegovina. View of the western exposure.
Valentin Jeck, commissioned by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2017

This July, New York’s Museum of Modern Art will open an exhibition dedicated to the architecture of the former Yugoslavia. Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948–1980 examines the bold building styles that emerged during the country’s decades-long existence—from International Style skyscrapers to Brutalist blocks.

Edvard Ravnikar, Revolution Square (today Republic Square), 1960-74, Ljubljana, Slovenia. View of the Square.
Valentin Jeck, commissioned by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2016

Organized by MoMA’s Chief Architecture and Design Curator Martino Stierli, guest curator Vladimir Kulić, and Curatorial Assistant Anna Kats, the exhibition’s 400-plus drawings, models, photos, and film reels feature the work of the regions’s leading architects, including Bogdan Bogdanović, Juraj Neidhardt, Svetlana Kana Radević, Edvard Ravnikar, Vjenceslav Richter, and Milica Šterić.

It will be the first U.S. exhibition to study socialist Yugoslavia’s architecture.

“From the sculptural interior of the White Mosque in rural Bosnia, to the post-earthquake reconstruction of the city of Skopje based on Kenzo Tange’s Metabolist design, to the new town of New Belgrade with its expressive large-scale housing blocks and civic buildings, the exhibition will examine the unique range of forms and modes of production in Yugoslav architecture and its distinct yet multifaceted character,” MoMA said in a statement.

The exhibition runs July 15, 2018 to January 13, 2019.

Stojan Maksimović, Sava Center, 1979, Belgrade, Serbia. View of conference room.
Valentin Jeck, commissioned by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2016.
Mihajlo Čanak, Leonid Lenarčić, Milosav Mitić, and Ivan Petrović. Building B9, Block 21, 1959-65. New Belgrade, Serbia. View of IMS Žeželj the construction site.
Ivan Petrović
Janko Konstantinov, Telecommunications Center, 1972-81, Skopje, Macedonia. Perspective drawing of the counter hall. Ozalid and tracing paper.
Courtesy MoMA

Via: ArchDaily