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Tiny concrete cabin makes a cool off-grid getaway

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Get a dose of nature and Brutalism all at once

Chairs facing wood burning stove and windows Photo by Mitch Allen/The Lost Whiskey Club via The Spaces

There’s nothing like concrete to make a person appreciate the natural world. Maybe it’s the manmade nature of it, or the hard angles, but a little Brutalism goes a long way when it’s set in the bucolic countryside.

Take, for example, the Lost Whiskey Cabin, a compact concrete dwelling set at the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains. Designed by Virginia-based design-build firm GreenSpur, the rustic cabin is part of the studio’s Lost Whiskey Club—a series of remote vacation homes that encourage visitors to get off the grid.

Wood dining table and chairs Photo by Mitch Allen/The Lost Whiskey Club via The Spaces
Murphy bed with pillows Photo by Mitch Allen/The Lost Whiskey Club via The Spaces

The cabin is 160-square-feet of pure, raw concrete. Built from precast panels, the boxy dwelling looks like a high-end bunker with some glass. The simple one-room layout includes a Murphy bed-turned-dining room table, small kitchen, wood burning stove, and seating area with operable windows that open onto a concrete patio where you can take advantage of a fire-heated dutch tub, a fire pit, and a hammock.

Concrete patio with chairs, fire pit, and hot tub Photo by Mitch Allen/The Lost Whiskey Club via The Spaces

Sounds nice, right? Unfortunately, it comes with a catch. Only members of the Lost Whiskey Club can rent the cabin, and the club caps out at ten memberships. For everyone else, ogling its industrial beauty from afar will have to do.

Concrete house in the woods Photo by Mitch Allen/The Lost Whiskey Club via The Spaces

Via: The Spaces