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Looking at this ultra-black Winter Olympics pavilion is like staring into space

Corner shot of a super black box with tiny lights on the side of it, located in an industrial space.
Asif Khan’s pavilion is coated in Vantablack VBx2, a version of what is considered the darkest pigment in the world.
Photography by Luke Hayes via Dezeen

A dark structure has landed in Pyeongchang, South Korea, and it’s almost too black to be seen properly. Designed by London-based architect Asif Khan as part of Hyundai Motor’s global mobility initiative, the pavilion is coated in Vantablack VBx2, a version of what is considered the darkest pigment in the world (and is now owned by artist Anish Kapoor).

The simple temporary structure, which is located inside Olympic Park, measures 10 meters high (32.8 feet) with a 35-meter-by-35-meter footprint and features a steel construction and a parabolic facade that is studded with thin rods with tiny lights at the tip, creating the atmosphere of being in space.

Because of the super-black spray-paint coating the pavilion, it is nearly impossible for the human eye to make out the contours of the building. In a statement, Khan described his vision:

From a distance the structure has the appearance of a window looking into the depths of outer space. As you approach it, this impression grows to fill your entire field of view. So on entering the building, it feels as though you are being absorbed into a cloud of blackness.

But entering the pavilion, one is brought into a seemingly new dimension. A large white room clad in Corian creates an immersive water installation, in which 25,000 water droplets are released every minute and travel along carved channels until reaching a central pool.

The pavilion was commissioned by Hyundai Motors in association with its Hydrogen Fuel Cell vehicles and opens on February 9.

Via: Dezeen, ArchDaily