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Perfectly preserved Frank Lloyd Wright Usonian near NYC asks $1.2M

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The unique hexagonal design features no right angles

Photos courtesy of the owners

A Frank Lloyd Wright-designed home has just hit the market, and this time it’s a gorgeous three-bedroom, two-bath Usonian only 35 minutes from New York City. Located in Glen Ridge, New Jersey, the 1,800-square-foot Stuart Richardson House was built in 1951 and is one of only three remaining homes in the Garden State designed by Wright.

The design consists of a unique hexagonal floor plan that uses almost all 60 or 120-degree angles with no right angles in sight. The brick house boasts cypress paneling and woodwork, most notably on the ceilings where boards meet at chevron-like angles. Deep red, hexagon-shaped tiles form the home’s stunning heated floors, while triangle skylights and patterned clerestory windows puncture the flat roofline.

Like in most of Wright’s Usonian designs, floor-to-ceiling windows let the light in, but the home’s most distinctive feature is a triangular living room with a one-of-a-kind inverted pyramid ceiling and 14 French doors that open onto a patio. Other features include a dramatic cantilevered entryway into a screened-in porch, built-in shelves throughout, a triangular wood-burning fireplace, and distinctive triangular recessed lighting that Wright also used in the Guggenheim Museum.

The home was meticulously restored in 2006 and sits on a gated half-acre plot with a stream and in-ground swimming pool. If you’re ready to own a piece of architecture history, 63 Chestnut Hill Place is on the market for $1,200,000.

The 1951 house sits on a half-acre lot with a pond and private pool.
Deep red, hexagon-shaped tiles form the home’s heated floors, while patterned clerestory windows puncture the flat roofline.
The home’s most distinctive feature is a triangular living room with a one-of-a-kind inverted pyramid ceiling and 14 French doors that open onto a patio.
The kitchen features a hexagonal skylight and recessed triangle lighting that was also used in the Guggenheim Museum.
The brick house boasts cypress paneling and woodwork, most notably on the ceilings where boards meet at chevron-like angles.
The living room fireplace at night.