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Curbed Ski's Map Of Delicious Ski Town Architecture

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While it might not be obvious, there is some seriously good, seriously inventive, and seriously wild architecture out there in ski country. With money pouring in from gold mining, the Olympics, Silicon Valley, and even the Playboy empire, name-brand architects have been brought in from around the world to build ski homes, hotels, and libraries of the highest (and sometimes craziest) design in towns like Telluride, Squaw Valley, and Whistler. Curbed Ski brings you our walking tour of some of the best ski-town architecture in North America.

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1. Hotel Jerome

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330 East Main Street
Aspen, CO 81611
(970) 920-1000
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Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Jerome was built by former Macy's co-owner Jerome B. Wheeler in the 1880's, and has been the most iconic downtown Aspen building ever since. The legendary J Bar inspired a signature Prohibition cocktail called the Aspen Crud and a song by an Eagles bandmember. It was also one of the first buildings West of the Mississippi to have full electric lighting, hosted Hunter S. Thompson's memorial service, and just finished an award-winning interior reno.

2. The Copper Palace

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Trentaz Drive & North Starwood Road
Aspen, CO 81611

The Copper Palace is the manifestation of the imagination of former Playmate and Hugh Hefner's first wife, Barbi Benton. The Bart Prince-designed 25,000 square foot manse in Aspen's exclusive Starwood neighborhood consists of five cantilevered copper pods. Each has stunning views of all of Aspen and they're filled out separately by a 29-person couch, a hidden 80-person ballroom, and a 1,500 square foot nightclub with trippy crystal-themed decore. [link]

3. New Sheridan Hotel

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231 West Colorado Avenue, Uncompahgre National Forest
Telluride, CO 81320
(970) 728-4351
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The New Sheridan is the pinnacle of the 19th-century Victorian architecture that makes towns like Telluride and Crested Butte famous world-wide. Built with gold mining money when Telluride was only four years old, the brick facade of the 26-room hotel and its modest Old West interior are like something out of a John Wayne film.

4. Fireside Resort

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2780 Moose Wilson Road
Wilson, WY 83014

Fireside Resort sports 19 "cabins" that are actually prefabricated modular homes built in the same footprint as an RV. Local designed firm Wheelhaus designed these "wedge" models, an experiment in small space living. They're still shockingly spacious, as the sloped roof grows to provide a 17 foot high ceiling in the living room, while first-rate decor and use of space would never let you believe you're living in only 400 square feet. [link]

5. Main Street- Park City, UT

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Main Street & Heber Avenue
Park City, UT 84060

Park City exploded with a silver mining boom in the 19th-century, which funded much of its well-preserved Victorian architecture downtown. While the town almost collapsed with the end of mining, the opening of a ski area in 1963 saved the town and its eclectic mix of colorful storefronts Main Street may be heavily commercialized, but there's plenty of quaint neighborhoods just off of it with tiny painted homes climbing up the mountainside worth exploring. If interested, be sure to take the architectural walking tour June 27th.

6. Thunderbird Lodge

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Highway 28
Incline Village, NV
(775) 832-8750
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The Thunderbird Lodge was the favorite retreat of one of the the Great Depression's forgotten eccentric billionaires, George Whittell, Jr. Whittell was born into a massive railroad and real estate inheritance that today would be worth $49 billion. Vowing to never work a day in his life, George broke his vow only once to be in Europe's Barnum & Bailey Circus against his parents' wishes. He later bought up 20 of Lake Tahoe's 72 miles of shoreline, and built a small castle with no guest rooms, since his reclusive nature precluded overnight visitors. For similar reasons, he decided to keep the rest of the East Shore neighbor-free, along with a 600-foot tunnel connecting the boathouse for his 55-foot art deco yacht to the house so no one could see him. A renowned animal lover as well, Whittell kept a pet tiger and a two-ton elephant on the property, as well as an underground dungeon.

7. The Ski House at Squaw

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215 Granite Chief Road, Tahoe National Forest
Olympic Valley, CA 96146

Sitting in the middle of an active avalanche path directly under the Squaw Valley funitel at the base of the mountain, The Ski House at Squaw is impossible to miss. The main room, a giant steel box with exposed beams inspired by ski lifts and wrapped in redwood, offers 270-degree views of the mountain, and an all-glass ground floor "ski room" offers direct access to the slopes from its sliding glass doors. Built for "a family of four avid skiers and snowboarders," The Ski House at Squaw can be rented for $5,000/night during the ski season.

8. Timberline Lodge

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27500 Timberline Highway, Mt. Hood National Forest
Government Camp, OR 97028
(503) 272-3311
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One of the most infamous of America's great mountain lodges, the Timberline Lodge was first the failed dream of Portland developer Emerson J. Griffith before he was hired as Oregon's administrator for public works during the Great Depression. Once on the job, he first request was to build the lodge on the South slope as a center for year-round recreation. The feds would eventually start work on it in 1836, building the two enormous wings and a hexagonal entrance in the Cascadian style, by hand, out of heavy timber and stone. While most famously serving as the Overlook Hotel in The Shining, it has been hosting visitors for year-round skiing and snowboarding on Mount Hood for generations.

9. The Rainbow Passive House

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Bear Paw Trail, Whistler
BC V0N 1B8, Canada

The Rainbow Passive House, built for the 2010 Winter Olympics, was one of the first of its kind in North America. Passive homes, a technology that originated in Germany, are built out of prefabricated wall panels that make for a super-insulated and airtight home that crushes North American green building standards with extreme energy efficiency and heat retention. They're also about the most beautiful things associated with the words words "pre-fab."

10. Whistler Public Library

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4329 Main Street, Whistler
BC V0N 1B4, Canada
(604) 935-8433
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Designed by Hughes Condon Marler Architects, the Whistler Public Library is LEED Gold-certified and sports a huge sloping green roof, under which sits a stunning exercise in modernism built of wood, concrete, and local basalt . The roof slopes up on one side so the floor-to-ceiling glass can take in more light and heat, while the south side entrance and plaza reach towards the Village to pull visitors in. [link]

1. Hotel Jerome

330 East Main Street, Aspen, CO 81611

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Jerome was built by former Macy's co-owner Jerome B. Wheeler in the 1880's, and has been the most iconic downtown Aspen building ever since. The legendary J Bar inspired a signature Prohibition cocktail called the Aspen Crud and a song by an Eagles bandmember. It was also one of the first buildings West of the Mississippi to have full electric lighting, hosted Hunter S. Thompson's memorial service, and just finished an award-winning interior reno.

330 East Main Street
Aspen, CO 81611

2. The Copper Palace

Trentaz Drive & North Starwood Road, Aspen, CO 81611

The Copper Palace is the manifestation of the imagination of former Playmate and Hugh Hefner's first wife, Barbi Benton. The Bart Prince-designed 25,000 square foot manse in Aspen's exclusive Starwood neighborhood consists of five cantilevered copper pods. Each has stunning views of all of Aspen and they're filled out separately by a 29-person couch, a hidden 80-person ballroom, and a 1,500 square foot nightclub with trippy crystal-themed decore. [link]

Trentaz Drive & North Starwood Road
Aspen, CO 81611

3. New Sheridan Hotel

231 West Colorado Avenue, Uncompahgre National Forest, Telluride, CO 81320

The New Sheridan is the pinnacle of the 19th-century Victorian architecture that makes towns like Telluride and Crested Butte famous world-wide. Built with gold mining money when Telluride was only four years old, the brick facade of the 26-room hotel and its modest Old West interior are like something out of a John Wayne film.

231 West Colorado Avenue, Uncompahgre National Forest
Telluride, CO 81320

4. Fireside Resort

2780 Moose Wilson Road, Wilson, WY 83014

Fireside Resort sports 19 "cabins" that are actually prefabricated modular homes built in the same footprint as an RV. Local designed firm Wheelhaus designed these "wedge" models, an experiment in small space living. They're still shockingly spacious, as the sloped roof grows to provide a 17 foot high ceiling in the living room, while first-rate decor and use of space would never let you believe you're living in only 400 square feet. [link]

2780 Moose Wilson Road
Wilson, WY 83014

5. Main Street- Park City, UT

Main Street & Heber Avenue, Park City, UT 84060

Park City exploded with a silver mining boom in the 19th-century, which funded much of its well-preserved Victorian architecture downtown. While the town almost collapsed with the end of mining, the opening of a ski area in 1963 saved the town and its eclectic mix of colorful storefronts Main Street may be heavily commercialized, but there's plenty of quaint neighborhoods just off of it with tiny painted homes climbing up the mountainside worth exploring. If interested, be sure to take the architectural walking tour June 27th.

Main Street & Heber Avenue
Park City, UT 84060

6. Thunderbird Lodge

Highway 28, Incline Village, NV

The Thunderbird Lodge was the favorite retreat of one of the the Great Depression's forgotten eccentric billionaires, George Whittell, Jr. Whittell was born into a massive railroad and real estate inheritance that today would be worth $49 billion. Vowing to never work a day in his life, George broke his vow only once to be in Europe's Barnum & Bailey Circus against his parents' wishes. He later bought up 20 of Lake Tahoe's 72 miles of shoreline, and built a small castle with no guest rooms, since his reclusive nature precluded overnight visitors. For similar reasons, he decided to keep the rest of the East Shore neighbor-free, along with a 600-foot tunnel connecting the boathouse for his 55-foot art deco yacht to the house so no one could see him. A renowned animal lover as well, Whittell kept a pet tiger and a two-ton elephant on the property, as well as an underground dungeon.

Highway 28
Incline Village, NV

7. The Ski House at Squaw

215 Granite Chief Road, Tahoe National Forest, Olympic Valley, CA 96146

Sitting in the middle of an active avalanche path directly under the Squaw Valley funitel at the base of the mountain, The Ski House at Squaw is impossible to miss. The main room, a giant steel box with exposed beams inspired by ski lifts and wrapped in redwood, offers 270-degree views of the mountain, and an all-glass ground floor "ski room" offers direct access to the slopes from its sliding glass doors. Built for "a family of four avid skiers and snowboarders," The Ski House at Squaw can be rented for $5,000/night during the ski season.

215 Granite Chief Road, Tahoe National Forest
Olympic Valley, CA 96146

8. Timberline Lodge

27500 Timberline Highway, Mt. Hood National Forest, Government Camp, OR 97028

One of the most infamous of America's great mountain lodges, the Timberline Lodge was first the failed dream of Portland developer Emerson J. Griffith before he was hired as Oregon's administrator for public works during the Great Depression. Once on the job, he first request was to build the lodge on the South slope as a center for year-round recreation. The feds would eventually start work on it in 1836, building the two enormous wings and a hexagonal entrance in the Cascadian style, by hand, out of heavy timber and stone. While most famously serving as the Overlook Hotel in The Shining, it has been hosting visitors for year-round skiing and snowboarding on Mount Hood for generations.

27500 Timberline Highway, Mt. Hood National Forest
Government Camp, OR 97028

9. The Rainbow Passive House

Bear Paw Trail, Whistler, BC V0N 1B8, Canada

The Rainbow Passive House, built for the 2010 Winter Olympics, was one of the first of its kind in North America. Passive homes, a technology that originated in Germany, are built out of prefabricated wall panels that make for a super-insulated and airtight home that crushes North American green building standards with extreme energy efficiency and heat retention. They're also about the most beautiful things associated with the words words "pre-fab."

Bear Paw Trail, Whistler
BC V0N 1B8, Canada

10. Whistler Public Library

4329 Main Street, Whistler, BC V0N 1B4, Canada

Designed by Hughes Condon Marler Architects, the Whistler Public Library is LEED Gold-certified and sports a huge sloping green roof, under which sits a stunning exercise in modernism built of wood, concrete, and local basalt . The roof slopes up on one side so the floor-to-ceiling glass can take in more light and heat, while the south side entrance and plaza reach towards the Village to pull visitors in. [link]

4329 Main Street, Whistler
BC V0N 1B4, Canada