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A beach area in Tel Aviv which is adjacent to many tall city buildings. Getty Images/EyeEm

The 25 best things to do in Tel Aviv if you love design

Go for the Israeli city’s cache of Bauhaus architecture. Stay for its markets and beaches

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Tel Aviv, with its rambling, spice-laden markets, cache of Bauhaus-style architecture (the largest such concentration in the world), thriving culinary scene, and eight-plus miles of beachfront, is a unique destination. Though its relatively small population may suggest otherwise, this gateway to the Middle East is on par with any large modern city.

Envisioned as an English-style “Garden City” with an abundance of parks and public spaces, the tropical metropolis became a testing ground for Bauhaus-trained architects fleeing Nazi Germany, design bona fides that lend Tel Aviv its nickname, “The White City,” and have earned it a UNESCO World Heritage designation. It’s well worth a visit.

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1. Tel Aviv Museum of Art (מוזיאון תל אביב לאמנות)

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27 Shaul Hamelech Blvd.
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv
(+97) 236-077020
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Once the private collection of Tel Aviv’s first mayor, the city’s premiere art museum has now grown to encompass a sizeable collection of contemporary art works by Old Masters and many others. The angular Herta and Paul Amir building, designed by American architect Preston Scott Cohen as an addition to the original structure, has become a beacon since its completion in 2011.

The exterior of the Tel Aviv Museum of Art. The facade is white with a geometric structure. Shutterstock

2. Park HaYarkon (גני יהושוע / פארק הירקון)

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Located in the city’s north, this six-acre park, complete with manicured gardens, sports facilities and intercut by the tranquil Yarkon River, complements Tel Aviv’s urban charm. Featuring 3,500 species of plants and an impressive botanic garden, the park is the perfect place to take a stroll or rent a bike, while feeling as if you’ve left city life behind entirely. Also located in the park is the Yitzhak Rabin center, a museum celebrating the life of the assassinated former prime minister, designed by architect Moshe Safdie.

In the foreground is a park surrounded by trees. In the distance is a city skyline with many tall city buildings. Shutterstock

3. Yoo Towers

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19-21 Nisim Aloni St.
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

Located in Park Tzamaret, this site, once a settlement of a Bedouin tribe, is now host to some of Tel Aviv’s priciest properties. Among them are Yoo Towers 1 and 2, designed by French designer Philippe Starck. The luxury towers, completed in 2007, feature the designer’s signature playful baroque interiors, complete with swimming pools, a movie theater for residents, and of course, sweeping views of the Mediterranean.

A group of tall city buildings in Tel Aviv. Shutterstock

4. Gordon Beach (חוף גורדון)

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Hayarkon St.
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

Tel Aviv’s eight-mile coast along the Mediterranean offers plenty of options for beach bums. Of the 16 beaches on offer, some of the most popular include Gordon-Frishman beach and Mezizim beach, the latter situated conveniently next to the northern port—an entertainment complex with dozens of beachfront restaurants.

Those who prefer a more active beach-going experience should head to Jerusalem beach, a popular place to play Matkot—an Israeli version of paddle ball.

Gordon Beach in Tel Aviv. The beach is sandy with palm trees. In the distance is a body of water. Getty Images

5. Rabin Square (כיכר רבין)

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Rabin Square
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

Dedicated to the late-president Yitzhak Rabin, who was assassinated in 1995 while in the process of negotiating a monumental peace deal with Palestine, this spacious square is often the site of political rallies. On the north end of the square, Tel Aviv’s hulking City Hall displays the 1950s penchant for Brutalist architecture that preceded the Bauhaus wave of the ’30s. A number of stylish bars and restaurants with outdoor seating line the western and southern ends of the plaza.

In the foreground is a body of water. Surrounding the body of water are city buildings, trees, and walking paths. Shutterstock

6. Bauhaus Center

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77 Dizengoff St.
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv
(+97) 235-220249
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A must-visit for those interested in learning more about Tel Aviv’s Bauhaus heritage, the center offers an extensive collection of books on the topic, and an exhibition space in the basement.

In addition to a guided tour offered once a week, a  90-minute, self-led walking tour takes visitors to over a dozen prominent Bauhaus buildings in the neighborhood including the Ehrlich house at 72 Herzl street and the Shiff house at 13 Herzl street, and explains how the style was adapted to fit the city’s tropical climate. The center also offers a variety of design-related goodies and sells work by local artists.

The Bauhaus Center in Tel Aviv. There are floor to ceiling windows and a sign that wraps around the front facade. Photo via Wikimedia Commons

7. Dizengoff Square / כיכר דיזנגוף

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Dizengoff Sq.
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

The buildings around this central square feature sleek Bauhaus designs from the 1920s and ’30s. With its signature sun-strip balconies, Cinema Chen is a prime example of a recently renovated International Style building—part of the municipality’s recent push to preserve its Bauhaus heritage.

The square itself was the social center of Tel Aviv until the ’70s, though this changed when the pedestrian area was raised to allow cars to pass underneath. Today, the square is undergoing renovation and will once again be pedestrian-friendly by the end of the year. Dizengoff Street itself is lined with eateries and bars, offering opportunities to soak up the city’s lively atmosphere.

Dizengoff Square in Tel Aviv. The square is surrounded by various city buildings. Shutterstock

8. Bialik Square

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27 Bialik St
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

Located around a quiet cul-de-sac at the end of Bialik Street, several buildings significant to the city’s history feature interesting architectural elements.

The first (Bialik St., Nr.22) is a whimsical Eclectic-style 1920s villa once home to Israel’s national poet, Chalim Nachman Bialik; today it’s a museum dedicated to his work. The former town hall, Beit Ha’ir (Nr. 27), is a majestic cultural center featuring an extensive exhibition detailing the city’s past. Art lovers will enjoy the Bauhaus-style Rubin Museum (Nr.14), the former home of painter Reuven Rubin, who painted scenes depicting life in Palestine in the 1920s.

Bialik Square in Tel Aviv. The square is full of people and is surrounded by assorted city buildings. Photo via Wikimedia Commons

9. Habima Square (כיכר הבימה)

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HaBima Square
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

Designed as a cultural hub by the city’s original urban planner, Patrick Geddes, this centrally located square underwent an extensive renovation in 2007. It is home to the impressive HaBima Theater—the country’s national theater, and the Culture Palace, home of the Israeli Philharmonic Orchestra.

There is also a well-manicured flower garden in the center of the square, which plays recordings of classical music. To the north of the square sits Helena Rubenstein Pavilion, a 1959 Bauhaus-style building that houses an exhibition space and a permanent collection of decorative art.

Habima Square in Tel Aviv. The square is full of colorful flower and green grass plots. In the distance are city buildings. Photo via Wikimedia Commons

10. Sarona (מתחם שרונה)

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In the late 19th century, Protestant German settlers known as Templers settled in this community in Tel Aviv. However, the group was expelled by the British in the 1930s when many began to voice support for the rise of Adolf Hitler. In 2006, 33 buildings—many over 140 years old—were restored, and now house restaurants, cafes, boutiques, and bars on a green swathe of land nestled between several high rises. Don’t miss the upscale Sarona market next door—an indoor marketplace, offering everything from European specialty goods to high-end Middle Eastern cuisine.

A street in Tel Aviv lined with palm trees and assorted houses. Photo via Wikimedia Commons

11. Tel Aviv Cinematheque (סינמטק תל אביב)

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2 Sprinzak St
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv
(+97) 236-060800
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This angular building completed in 1989 by Israeli architect Salo Hershman is perhaps unlike any other in the city. Host to five theaters, a movie archive, and occasional festivals—like TLVFest dedicated to LGTBQ cinema—catching a film in the Cinematheque can be a great way to take a break from city sightseeing. The Israeli Film Center, which opened in 2011 and was also designed by Hershman, features a similarly unusual structure, and hosts exhibitions of Israeli artwork on the ground floor.

The Tel Aviv Cinematheque. The facade is tan with a red entrance area. Shutterstock

12. Palm Tree House

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Nahalat Binyamin St 8
Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israel

This building is a striking example of the Eclectic architectural style popular in the 1920s. The style can be broadly characterized as comprising neoclassical elements fused with Romantic and Byzantine influences.

This particular house features a mix of Art Nouveau, Art Deco and Classical styles, as well as Jewish motifs, like the Star of David, plus the palm tree-shaped entrance that gives it its name.

The building isn’t the only Eclectic edifice on the street—the red-domed Nordau Hotel on the corner of Rehov Gruzenberg, the city’s longest-running hotel, is also a prominent example. On Tuesdays and Thursdays, the street plays host to a high-quality artisan market that is well worth a visit.

A tall yellow and white house called the Palm Tree House in Tel Aviv. Shutterstock

13. Carmel Market (שוק הכרמל)

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HaCarmel St
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

Stretching from lively Allenby street to Magen David Square, Tel Aviv’s most famous market is a fantastic place not only to stock up on local delicacies—like salted fish, pastries, or fresh produce—but also to enjoy an inexpensive, but high-quality, sit-down meal.

Chef-owned stalls on the market’s side streets feature restaurants that vie for the title of Best Hummus, or offer the chance for adventurous eaters to try plates like Jerusalem mixed grill—a rich dish of chicken hearts, spleens, and livers. Be sure to sample the halva, a tahini-based dense candy popular throughout the Middle East.

Carmel Market in Tel Aviv. The outside market is full of covered stalls with various food items and products. There are people shopping in the market. Photo via Wikimedia Commons

14. The Rothschild

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Rothschild Blvd 71
Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israel

This high-end boutique hotel—built in 1934 and named after French banking magnate Baron Edmond James Rothschild—is a prime example of an unornamented International Style building. Just outside its doors, tree-lined Rothschild Boulevard is an excellent place to walk or bike while taking in examples of Art Nouveau and renovated Bauhaus-style architecture along the way.

15. The Great Synagogue (בית הכנסת הגדול)

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110 Allenby Street
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv
(+97) 254-4322160

Designed in 1922 by prolific Israeli architect Yahudi Magidovich, this large synagogue sits at the heart of Tel Aviv’s financial center. Somewhat unexpectedly, the square surrounding it is host to a series of hip bars and restaurants, popular with a young crowd. Strolling the streets nearby offers a chance to visit art galleries, like Gallery 32 (Ahad Ha'Am St 32), which presents works by contemporary artists in another eclectic-style building erected in the 1920s.

The exterior of the Great Synagogue in Tel Aviv. The facade has tall windows and a flat white roof. Photo via Wikimedia Commons

16. Shalom Meir Tower

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9 Ahad Ha'am St
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv
(+97) 235-170991

Israel’s first skyscraper—the Shalom Meir Tower, completed in 1961—was once the tallest building in the Middle East. Despite its post-Bauhaus façade and a somewhat drab exterior, it remains a prominent landmark in the center of Tel Aviv’s first Jewish neighborhood.

Another noteworthy building nearby is jeweler Akiva Ari Weiss’s former home (Number 2 Herzl St.), a shining example of a renovated Eclectic-style building and one of few in the area not demolished during the Bauhaus wave of the 1930s. Like others built in the same period, it started as a one-story house before a second floor was added as the city grew.

An aerial view of the Shalom Meir Tower in Tel Aviv. The tower is taller than the surrounding city buildings. In the distance is a body of water. Photo via Wikimapia

17. Shabazi Street, Neve Tzadek

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Shalom Shabazi St.
Tel-Aviv, Neve Tzedek

Founded in 1887, Tel Aviv’s oldest neighborhood is undeniably one of its most charming—and perhaps most glamorous. Colorful Ottoman-era buildings line cobblestone streets and are home to a variety of boutiques and shops, luxury boutique hotels and hip restaurants, particularly along the neighborhood’s main thoroughfare, Shabazi street. Housed in a former girls’ school built in 1908, the Suzanne Dellal Center for Dance serves as the country’s premiere contemporary dance venue.

Shabazi Street in Tel Aviv. The facade is tan. Photo via Wikimedia Commons

18. Levinsky Market (שוק לוינסקי)

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Levinski St.
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

In rapidly transforming Florentin, this row of shops hearkens back to the neighborhood’s working-class Greek and Persian roots. Open every day—but most active on Fridays—the market offers an abundance of spices, dried fruits, nuts, and household goods.

Many shops at the market have been passed down among generations, with some dating to the late 19th century. In addition to classic shops—like rivaling delis Haim Rafael and Yam Tov—today the market is also home to a number of new, hip eateries, like popular hummus spot Garger HaZehav.

19. Florentin

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Often called the SoHo of Tel Aviv, Florentin is not quite as glamorous as its New York counterpart. With its youthful and artistic crowd, it may, though, be the hippest neighborhood in the city.

Tel Aviv’s nightlife takes flight on Vital street, which is filled with lively bars and restaurants. Those looking for more tranquil vibes can stroll the neighborhood’s narrow streets—perhaps discovering a record store or cocktail bar along the way.

Florentin also features an abundance of street art, much of it painted by well-known artists. Several streets away, The Block (Shalma Rd. 157), a top-notch nightclub, spins electronic beats until the wee hours of the morning.

20. Jaffa Old City

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Strolling through Jaffa, undeniably one of the most charming areas of Tel Aviv and historically an Arab stronghold, can feel like taking a walk back in time. Founded in the time of King Solomon (roughly 960 B.C.) the city was overtaken by British General Allenby, who expelled the Turkish population in 1917.

Today, it’s a favorite Israeli hangout, thanks to its cobblestone streets, artisan workshops, eateries, and abundance of boutiques. Start a walk at the Ottoman-era clocktower near HaShaon square, then walk to Kedumim Square, marked by the 13th-century baroque Franciscan St. Peter’s Church. Continue to the HaPisgah gardens, which offer great views of Tel Aviv’s coast.

A street in Jaffa Old City in Tel Aviv. The buildings adjacent to the street are stone and brick. There are people walking on the street. Photo via Wikimedia Commons

21. Hatikva Market (שוק התקווה)

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HaTikva 1
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

Visitors looking to step off the tourist trail will enjoy visiting this spacious and diverse market in a quiet neighborhood inhabited by many of the city’s migrants. Produce prices are lower than in central Tel Aviv, and include a large selection of spices, dried fruits, nuts, fresh produce, and all that a market—or ‘shuk’ in Arabic—can offer.

In addition to a variety of restaurants found off meandering side streets, don’t miss popular Yemeni food stall, HaSaluf, which specializes in jachnun, flaky rolls of dough served with tomato and hardboiled egg.

Produce on tables at Hatikva Market in Tel Aviv. People are looking at the food. Photo via Wikimedia Commons

22. Jaffa Flea Market

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16 Oley Zion St.
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

Located a short walk from Jaffa’s Old City, a series of cobblestone streets comprise the bustling Jaffa flea market—one of the oldest bazaars in the world.

Wander through the grid of streets branching from Olei Zion Street and you’ll find a lively selection of stalls offering Persian carpets, tiles, copper and brass goods, and all the vintage furniture you could ask for (haggling is a must). There are also clothing boutiques, cafes, and stalls selling artisan-made goods.

Combine an afternoon of shopping with a leisurely lunch at one of the bohemian restaurants (with outdoor seating) on Pinhas Ben Ya’ir or Rabbi Nahman streets.

23. Jaffa Port (נמל יפו)

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Jaffa Port Road
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv
(+97) 236-832255
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One of the oldest ports in the world—and the area from which the city of Tel Aviv grew—the ancient port is still used by local fishermen. However, in recent years, trendy shops and art galleries have popped up along the promenade.

Don’t miss the Jaffa Port Market, just below the old city. The converted former hangar features gourmet food stalls and plenty of shops ideal for design lovers, as well as a food market held on Friday mornings.

The Jaffa port in Tel Aviv. In the foreground is a body of water with boats. In the distance are many buildings. Photo via Wikimedia Commons

24. Design Museum Holon / מוזיאון הישראלי לעיצוב

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Pinhas Eylon 8
H̱olon, Tel Aviv
(+97) 273-2151515
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Located off the beaten path in the suburb of Holon (easily accessible by buses 3, 71, and 89 from central Tel Aviv), this museum—wrapped in a swirl of red steel and concrete—is the brainchild of boundary-pushing Israeli architect Rad Arad, and opened in 2010. Featuring a collection of Israeli-made designs showcased in a series of box-like exhibition spaces, the museum also hosts special installations and frequent events dedicated to increasing an understanding of contemporary design and global and local trends in the field.

25. HaTachana (מתחם התחנה)

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2 Koifman St.
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv
(+97) 235-168887
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Jaffa’s former train station complex is located between the charming neighborhood of Neve Tzadek and the Mediterranean Sea, and is home to 22 beautifully restored buildings that house a variety of restaurants, clothing stores, and cafes. Once the villa of a wealthy family of German settlers, building number 8 is now home to a boutique by a local Israeli clothing designer, while an Arab building known as “the red house” for its rouge plaster, houses a Swedish fashion brand.

The train station itself, once used by travelers heading to Jerusalem, was built in 1882 and displays an architectural style typical of the Templers—German Protestants who settled in the Holy Land in the 19th century.

A train station (HaTachana) in Tel Aviv. The station is in a building which is tan with arched windows and doors. Photo via Wikimedia Commons

1. Tel Aviv Museum of Art (מוזיאון תל אביב לאמנות)

27 Shaul Hamelech Blvd., Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv
The exterior of the Tel Aviv Museum of Art. The facade is white with a geometric structure. Shutterstock

Once the private collection of Tel Aviv’s first mayor, the city’s premiere art museum has now grown to encompass a sizeable collection of contemporary art works by Old Masters and many others. The angular Herta and Paul Amir building, designed by American architect Preston Scott Cohen as an addition to the original structure, has become a beacon since its completion in 2011.

27 Shaul Hamelech Blvd.
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

2. Park HaYarkon (גני יהושוע / פארק הירקון)

Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv
In the foreground is a park surrounded by trees. In the distance is a city skyline with many tall city buildings. Shutterstock

Located in the city’s north, this six-acre park, complete with manicured gardens, sports facilities and intercut by the tranquil Yarkon River, complements Tel Aviv’s urban charm. Featuring 3,500 species of plants and an impressive botanic garden, the park is the perfect place to take a stroll or rent a bike, while feeling as if you’ve left city life behind entirely. Also located in the park is the Yitzhak Rabin center, a museum celebrating the life of the assassinated former prime minister, designed by architect Moshe Safdie.

3. Yoo Towers

19-21 Nisim Aloni St., Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv
A group of tall city buildings in Tel Aviv. Shutterstock

Located in Park Tzamaret, this site, once a settlement of a Bedouin tribe, is now host to some of Tel Aviv’s priciest properties. Among them are Yoo Towers 1 and 2, designed by French designer Philippe Starck. The luxury towers, completed in 2007, feature the designer’s signature playful baroque interiors, complete with swimming pools, a movie theater for residents, and of course, sweeping views of the Mediterranean.

19-21 Nisim Aloni St.
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

4. Gordon Beach (חוף גורדון)

Hayarkon St., Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv
Gordon Beach in Tel Aviv. The beach is sandy with palm trees. In the distance is a body of water. Getty Images

Tel Aviv’s eight-mile coast along the Mediterranean offers plenty of options for beach bums. Of the 16 beaches on offer, some of the most popular include Gordon-Frishman beach and Mezizim beach, the latter situated conveniently next to the northern port—an entertainment complex with dozens of beachfront restaurants.

Those who prefer a more active beach-going experience should head to Jerusalem beach, a popular place to play Matkot—an Israeli version of paddle ball.

Hayarkon St.
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

5. Rabin Square (כיכר רבין)

Rabin Square, Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv
In the foreground is a body of water. Surrounding the body of water are city buildings, trees, and walking paths. Shutterstock

Dedicated to the late-president Yitzhak Rabin, who was assassinated in 1995 while in the process of negotiating a monumental peace deal with Palestine, this spacious square is often the site of political rallies. On the north end of the square, Tel Aviv’s hulking City Hall displays the 1950s penchant for Brutalist architecture that preceded the Bauhaus wave of the ’30s. A number of stylish bars and restaurants with outdoor seating line the western and southern ends of the plaza.

Rabin Square
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

6. Bauhaus Center

77 Dizengoff St., Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv
The Bauhaus Center in Tel Aviv. There are floor to ceiling windows and a sign that wraps around the front facade. Photo via Wikimedia Commons

A must-visit for those interested in learning more about Tel Aviv’s Bauhaus heritage, the center offers an extensive collection of books on the topic, and an exhibition space in the basement.

In addition to a guided tour offered once a week, a  90-minute, self-led walking tour takes visitors to over a dozen prominent Bauhaus buildings in the neighborhood including the Ehrlich house at 72 Herzl street and the Shiff house at 13 Herzl street, and explains how the style was adapted to fit the city’s tropical climate. The center also offers a variety of design-related goodies and sells work by local artists.

77 Dizengoff St.
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

7. Dizengoff Square / כיכר דיזנגוף

Dizengoff Sq., Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv
Dizengoff Square in Tel Aviv. The square is surrounded by various city buildings. Shutterstock

The buildings around this central square feature sleek Bauhaus designs from the 1920s and ’30s. With its signature sun-strip balconies, Cinema Chen is a prime example of a recently renovated International Style building—part of the municipality’s recent push to preserve its Bauhaus heritage.

The square itself was the social center of Tel Aviv until the ’70s, though this changed when the pedestrian area was raised to allow cars to pass underneath. Today, the square is undergoing renovation and will once again be pedestrian-friendly by the end of the year. Dizengoff Street itself is lined with eateries and bars, offering opportunities to soak up the city’s lively atmosphere.

Dizengoff Sq.
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

8. Bialik Square

27 Bialik St, Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv
Bialik Square in Tel Aviv. The square is full of people and is surrounded by assorted city buildings. Photo via Wikimedia Commons

Located around a quiet cul-de-sac at the end of Bialik Street, several buildings significant to the city’s history feature interesting architectural elements.

The first (Bialik St., Nr.22) is a whimsical Eclectic-style 1920s villa once home to Israel’s national poet, Chalim Nachman Bialik; today it’s a museum dedicated to his work. The former town hall, Beit Ha’ir (Nr. 27), is a majestic cultural center featuring an extensive exhibition detailing the city’s past. Art lovers will enjoy the Bauhaus-style Rubin Museum (Nr.14), the former home of painter Reuven Rubin, who painted scenes depicting life in Palestine in the 1920s.

27 Bialik St
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

9. Habima Square (כיכר הבימה)

HaBima Square, Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv
Habima Square in Tel Aviv. The square is full of colorful flower and green grass plots. In the distance are city buildings. Photo via Wikimedia Commons

Designed as a cultural hub by the city’s original urban planner, Patrick Geddes, this centrally located square underwent an extensive renovation in 2007. It is home to the impressive HaBima Theater—the country’s national theater, and the Culture Palace, home of the Israeli Philharmonic Orchestra.

There is also a well-manicured flower garden in the center of the square, which plays recordings of classical music. To the north of the square sits Helena Rubenstein Pavilion, a 1959 Bauhaus-style building that houses an exhibition space and a permanent collection of decorative art.

HaBima Square
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

10. Sarona (מתחם שרונה)

תל אביב
A street in Tel Aviv lined with palm trees and assorted houses. Photo via Wikimedia Commons

In the late 19th century, Protestant German settlers known as Templers settled in this community in Tel Aviv. However, the group was expelled by the British in the 1930s when many began to voice support for the rise of Adolf Hitler. In 2006, 33 buildings—many over 140 years old—were restored, and now house restaurants, cafes, boutiques, and bars on a green swathe of land nestled between several high rises. Don’t miss the upscale Sarona market next door—an indoor marketplace, offering everything from European specialty goods to high-end Middle Eastern cuisine.

11. Tel Aviv Cinematheque (סינמטק תל אביב)

2 Sprinzak St, Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv
The Tel Aviv Cinematheque. The facade is tan with a red entrance area. Shutterstock

This angular building completed in 1989 by Israeli architect Salo Hershman is perhaps unlike any other in the city. Host to five theaters, a movie archive, and occasional festivals—like TLVFest dedicated to LGTBQ cinema—catching a film in the Cinematheque can be a great way to take a break from city sightseeing. The Israeli Film Center, which opened in 2011 and was also designed by Hershman, features a similarly unusual structure, and hosts exhibitions of Israeli artwork on the ground floor.

2 Sprinzak St
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

12. Palm Tree House

Nahalat Binyamin St 8, Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israel
A tall yellow and white house called the Palm Tree House in Tel Aviv. Shutterstock

This building is a striking example of the Eclectic architectural style popular in the 1920s. The style can be broadly characterized as comprising neoclassical elements fused with Romantic and Byzantine influences.

This particular house features a mix of Art Nouveau, Art Deco and Classical styles, as well as Jewish motifs, like the Star of David, plus the palm tree-shaped entrance that gives it its name.

The building isn’t the only Eclectic edifice on the street—the red-domed Nordau Hotel on the corner of Rehov Gruzenberg, the city’s longest-running hotel, is also a prominent example. On Tuesdays and Thursdays, the street plays host to a high-quality artisan market that is well worth a visit.

Nahalat Binyamin St 8
Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israel

13. Carmel Market (שוק הכרמל)

HaCarmel St, Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv
Carmel Market in Tel Aviv. The outside market is full of covered stalls with various food items and products. There are people shopping in the market. Photo via Wikimedia Commons

Stretching from lively Allenby street to Magen David Square, Tel Aviv’s most famous market is a fantastic place not only to stock up on local delicacies—like salted fish, pastries, or fresh produce—but also to enjoy an inexpensive, but high-quality, sit-down meal.

Chef-owned stalls on the market’s side streets feature restaurants that vie for the title of Best Hummus, or offer the chance for adventurous eaters to try plates like Jerusalem mixed grill—a rich dish of chicken hearts, spleens, and livers. Be sure to sample the halva, a tahini-based dense candy popular throughout the Middle East.

HaCarmel St
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

14. The Rothschild

Rothschild Blvd 71, Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israel

This high-end boutique hotel—built in 1934 and named after French banking magnate Baron Edmond James Rothschild—is a prime example of an unornamented International Style building. Just outside its doors, tree-lined Rothschild Boulevard is an excellent place to walk or bike while taking in examples of Art Nouveau and renovated Bauhaus-style architecture along the way.

Rothschild Blvd 71
Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israel

15. The Great Synagogue (בית הכנסת הגדול)

110 Allenby Street, Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv
The exterior of the Great Synagogue in Tel Aviv. The facade has tall windows and a flat white roof. Photo via Wikimedia Commons

Designed in 1922 by prolific Israeli architect Yahudi Magidovich, this large synagogue sits at the heart of Tel Aviv’s financial center. Somewhat unexpectedly, the square surrounding it is host to a series of hip bars and restaurants, popular with a young crowd. Strolling the streets nearby offers a chance to visit art galleries, like Gallery 32 (Ahad Ha'Am St 32), which presents works by contemporary artists in another eclectic-style building erected in the 1920s.

110 Allenby Street
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

16. Shalom Meir Tower

9 Ahad Ha'am St, Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv
An aerial view of the Shalom Meir Tower in Tel Aviv. The tower is taller than the surrounding city buildings. In the distance is a body of water. Photo via Wikimapia

Israel’s first skyscraper—the Shalom Meir Tower, completed in 1961—was once the tallest building in the Middle East. Despite its post-Bauhaus façade and a somewhat drab exterior, it remains a prominent landmark in the center of Tel Aviv’s first Jewish neighborhood.

Another noteworthy building nearby is jeweler Akiva Ari Weiss’s former home (Number 2 Herzl St.), a shining example of a renovated Eclectic-style building and one of few in the area not demolished during the Bauhaus wave of the 1930s. Like others built in the same period, it started as a one-story house before a second floor was added as the city grew.

9 Ahad Ha'am St
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

17. Shabazi Street, Neve Tzadek

Shalom Shabazi St., Tel-Aviv, Neve Tzedek
Shabazi Street in Tel Aviv. The facade is tan. Photo via Wikimedia Commons

Founded in 1887, Tel Aviv’s oldest neighborhood is undeniably one of its most charming—and perhaps most glamorous. Colorful Ottoman-era buildings line cobblestone streets and are home to a variety of boutiques and shops, luxury boutique hotels and hip restaurants, particularly along the neighborhood’s main thoroughfare, Shabazi street. Housed in a former girls’ school built in 1908, the Suzanne Dellal Center for Dance serves as the country’s premiere contemporary dance venue.

Shalom Shabazi St.
Tel-Aviv, Neve Tzedek

18. Levinsky Market (שוק לוינסקי)

Levinski St., Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

In rapidly transforming Florentin, this row of shops hearkens back to the neighborhood’s working-class Greek and Persian roots. Open every day—but most active on Fridays—the market offers an abundance of spices, dried fruits, nuts, and household goods.

Many shops at the market have been passed down among generations, with some dating to the late 19th century. In addition to classic shops—like rivaling delis Haim Rafael and Yam Tov—today the market is also home to a number of new, hip eateries, like popular hummus spot Garger HaZehav.

Levinski St.
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

19. Florentin

Often called the SoHo of Tel Aviv, Florentin is not quite as glamorous as its New York counterpart. With its youthful and artistic crowd, it may, though, be the hippest neighborhood in the city.

Tel Aviv’s nightlife takes flight on Vital street, which is filled with lively bars and restaurants. Those looking for more tranquil vibes can stroll the neighborhood’s narrow streets—perhaps discovering a record store or cocktail bar along the way.

Florentin also features an abundance of street art, much of it painted by well-known artists. Several streets away, The Block (Shalma Rd. 157), a top-notch nightclub, spins electronic beats until the wee hours of the morning.

20. Jaffa Old City

Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv
A street in Jaffa Old City in Tel Aviv. The buildings adjacent to the street are stone and brick. There are people walking on the street. Photo via Wikimedia Commons

Strolling through Jaffa, undeniably one of the most charming areas of Tel Aviv and historically an Arab stronghold, can feel like taking a walk back in time. Founded in the time of King Solomon (roughly 960 B.C.) the city was overtaken by British General Allenby, who expelled the Turkish population in 1917.

Today, it’s a favorite Israeli hangout, thanks to its cobblestone streets, artisan workshops, eateries, and abundance of boutiques. Start a walk at the Ottoman-era clocktower near HaShaon square, then walk to Kedumim Square, marked by the 13th-century baroque Franciscan St. Peter’s Church. Continue to the HaPisgah gardens, which offer great views of Tel Aviv’s coast.

21. Hatikva Market (שוק התקווה)

HaTikva 1, Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv
Produce on tables at Hatikva Market in Tel Aviv. People are looking at the food. Photo via Wikimedia Commons

Visitors looking to step off the tourist trail will enjoy visiting this spacious and diverse market in a quiet neighborhood inhabited by many of the city’s migrants. Produce prices are lower than in central Tel Aviv, and include a large selection of spices, dried fruits, nuts, fresh produce, and all that a market—or ‘shuk’ in Arabic—can offer.

In addition to a variety of restaurants found off meandering side streets, don’t miss popular Yemeni food stall, HaSaluf, which specializes in jachnun, flaky rolls of dough served with tomato and hardboiled egg.

HaTikva 1
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

22. Jaffa Flea Market

16 Oley Zion St., Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

Located a short walk from Jaffa’s Old City, a series of cobblestone streets comprise the bustling Jaffa flea market—one of the oldest bazaars in the world.

Wander through the grid of streets branching from Olei Zion Street and you’ll find a lively selection of stalls offering Persian carpets, tiles, copper and brass goods, and all the vintage furniture you could ask for (haggling is a must). There are also clothing boutiques, cafes, and stalls selling artisan-made goods.

Combine an afternoon of shopping with a leisurely lunch at one of the bohemian restaurants (with outdoor seating) on Pinhas Ben Ya’ir or Rabbi Nahman streets.

16 Oley Zion St.
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

23. Jaffa Port (נמל יפו)

Jaffa Port Road, Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv
The Jaffa port in Tel Aviv. In the foreground is a body of water with boats. In the distance are many buildings. Photo via Wikimedia Commons

One of the oldest ports in the world—and the area from which the city of Tel Aviv grew—the ancient port is still used by local fishermen. However, in recent years, trendy shops and art galleries have popped up along the promenade.

Don’t miss the Jaffa Port Market, just below the old city. The converted former hangar features gourmet food stalls and plenty of shops ideal for design lovers, as well as a food market held on Friday mornings.

Jaffa Port Road
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv

24. Design Museum Holon / מוזיאון הישראלי לעיצוב

Pinhas Eylon 8, H̱olon, Tel Aviv

Located off the beaten path in the suburb of Holon (easily accessible by buses 3, 71, and 89 from central Tel Aviv), this museum—wrapped in a swirl of red steel and concrete—is the brainchild of boundary-pushing Israeli architect Rad Arad, and opened in 2010. Featuring a collection of Israeli-made designs showcased in a series of box-like exhibition spaces, the museum also hosts special installations and frequent events dedicated to increasing an understanding of contemporary design and global and local trends in the field.

Pinhas Eylon 8
H̱olon, Tel Aviv

25. HaTachana (מתחם התחנה)

2 Koifman St., Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv
A train station (HaTachana) in Tel Aviv. The station is in a building which is tan with arched windows and doors. Photo via Wikimedia Commons

Jaffa’s former train station complex is located between the charming neighborhood of Neve Tzadek and the Mediterranean Sea, and is home to 22 beautifully restored buildings that house a variety of restaurants, clothing stores, and cafes. Once the villa of a wealthy family of German settlers, building number 8 is now home to a boutique by a local Israeli clothing designer, while an Arab building known as “the red house” for its rouge plaster, houses a Swedish fashion brand.

The train station itself, once used by travelers heading to Jerusalem, was built in 1882 and displays an architectural style typical of the Templers—German Protestants who settled in the Holy Land in the 19th century.

2 Koifman St.
Tel Aviv, Tel Aviv