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The Most Iconic Buildings in Ski Country, Mapped

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Whether ski towns originally formed for mining, agriculture, recreation or another industry, the history of their early days can be the richest part of the experience. The buildings from those founding years often form the popular images and reputations for these towns. To that end, Curbed Ski has mapped some of the most iconic buildings in ski country.


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1. Vikingsholm

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CA-89
Tahoma, CA 96142
(530) 525-9530
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This 38-room, stone Scandinavian mansion on the edge of Lake Tahoe's Emerald Bay is just as beautiful as the world-famous scenery it inhabits. On the National Register of Historic Places, this mansion was built in 1929 by Lora Josephine Knight, who also had a tea house built for her on an island in the middle of Emerald Bay. Parts of Vikingsholm were built with construction techniques so old that there are no nails, pegs or spikes. Inspiration for the structure and its furnishings was drawn from the 11th, 18th and 19th centuries as well as architectural styles like American Craftsman. Best of all, since it's now a public park, you can hike down and take a guided tour.

2. Chateau Lake Louise

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111 Lake Louise Dr, Improvement District No. 9
AB T0L, Canada
+1 403-522-3511
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In one of the most stunning settings in ski country sits the Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise on the edge of Lake Louise in Banff National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The 550-room chateau started as a log cabin but went through years of construction, fires and reconstruction to grow into something that resembles the current luxury hotel. Generations of mountaineers and celebrities have passed through the chateau, and thanks to a 1982 renovation, the originally summer-only resort is now a year-round destination.

3. Sun Valley Lodge

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1 Sun Valley Rd
Sun Valley, ID 83353
(800) 786-8259
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Designed by Gilbert Stanley Underwood in 1935, Sun Valley Lodge is an excellent representation of rustic style in ski country. The property underwent a major renovation and opens this season with luxurious new guest rooms.

4. Egyptian Theatre

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328 Main St
Park City, UT 84060
(435) 649-9371
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It was snow that brought about the Egyptian Theatre. The Dewey Theatre collapsed in 1916 under the load of record snowfall, and the Egyptian debuted in 1926 on the same site. The name and style came out of the era's fascination with King Tut's tomb. Not only was it the first sound cinema in Park City, it's been the key venue for the Sundance Film Festival for about as long as the festival has been around.

5. Million Dollar Cowboy Bar

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25 N Cache St
Jackson, WY 83001
(307) 733-2207
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This is an iconic ski town institution at its Wild West best. The Million Dollar Cowboy Bar has a long history in Jackson, with the building existing since the town's earliest years and the bar getting "Cowboy Bar" moniker in 1937. The bar's Cowboy motif comes along with a collection of Western memorabilia and a giant neon sign that calls you in.

6. New Sheridan Hotel

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231 W Colorado Ave
Telluride, CO 81320
(970) 728-4351
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Telluride's New Sheridan Hotel has been around for more than 100 years. The original wood structure burned after only a few years and was replaced with the current three-story brick building. The historic hotel reflects the wealth of Telluride's early mining days and has managed to retain a lot of the feel and details of that era while modernizing. The Historic Bar at street level is one of the most popular and iconic watering holes in all of ski country.

7. Wheeler Opera House

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320 E Hyman Ave
Aspen, CO 81611
(970) 920-5770
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The Wheeler Opera House opened in 1889 even as the brick building was constructed through the 1890s. After a fire, it fell into decades of disuse but opened again in 1950 and now hosts all kinds of shows, events and festivals. It was also Aspen's first building to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

8. More Barn

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605 Anglers Ct
Steamboat Springs, CO 80487

The More Barn rose into Steamboat skiing lore through necessity and a bit of luck. The resort was planning its marketing for the 1971-72 season and wanted a barn for the photo shoot. At the foot of Mount Werner, the More Barn provided the perfect backdrop for a cowboy and cowgirl riding with their skis. Eighteen inches of snow fell the night before the photo shoot, and the resulting poster has been synonymous with Steamboat's Western charm ever since.

9. Hotel St. Bernard

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15 Twining Rd
Taos Ski Valley, NM 87525
(575) 776-8506
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There still isn't a ton of lodging at the base of Taos Ski Valley, but Hotel St. Bernard was one of the first, luring visitors with the tradition of the ski week. The hotel was founded in 1960 by French-born Jean Mayer, who settled in the U.S. after working with the 10th Mountain Division in World War II. The hotel has been a constant through the growth of TSV, and even if a ski week is out of reach, the deck is a popular après spot that should be experienced.

10. Stowe Community Church

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137 Main St
Stowe, VT 05672
(802) 253-7257
Visit Website

This New England colonial church building was completed in 1863 as a home for the Universalists but became one of the nation's first non-denominational churches when Stowe's congregations decided to merge. The spire of building's steeple poking above the foliage has become an iconic view of Stowe.

1. Vikingsholm

CA-89, Tahoma, CA 96142

This 38-room, stone Scandinavian mansion on the edge of Lake Tahoe's Emerald Bay is just as beautiful as the world-famous scenery it inhabits. On the National Register of Historic Places, this mansion was built in 1929 by Lora Josephine Knight, who also had a tea house built for her on an island in the middle of Emerald Bay. Parts of Vikingsholm were built with construction techniques so old that there are no nails, pegs or spikes. Inspiration for the structure and its furnishings was drawn from the 11th, 18th and 19th centuries as well as architectural styles like American Craftsman. Best of all, since it's now a public park, you can hike down and take a guided tour.

CA-89
Tahoma, CA 96142

2. Chateau Lake Louise

111 Lake Louise Dr, Improvement District No. 9, AB T0L, Canada

In one of the most stunning settings in ski country sits the Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise on the edge of Lake Louise in Banff National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The 550-room chateau started as a log cabin but went through years of construction, fires and reconstruction to grow into something that resembles the current luxury hotel. Generations of mountaineers and celebrities have passed through the chateau, and thanks to a 1982 renovation, the originally summer-only resort is now a year-round destination.

111 Lake Louise Dr, Improvement District No. 9
AB T0L, Canada

3. Sun Valley Lodge

1 Sun Valley Rd, Sun Valley, ID 83353

Designed by Gilbert Stanley Underwood in 1935, Sun Valley Lodge is an excellent representation of rustic style in ski country. The property underwent a major renovation and opens this season with luxurious new guest rooms.

1 Sun Valley Rd
Sun Valley, ID 83353

4. Egyptian Theatre

328 Main St, Park City, UT 84060

It was snow that brought about the Egyptian Theatre. The Dewey Theatre collapsed in 1916 under the load of record snowfall, and the Egyptian debuted in 1926 on the same site. The name and style came out of the era's fascination with King Tut's tomb. Not only was it the first sound cinema in Park City, it's been the key venue for the Sundance Film Festival for about as long as the festival has been around.

328 Main St
Park City, UT 84060

5. Million Dollar Cowboy Bar

25 N Cache St, Jackson, WY 83001

This is an iconic ski town institution at its Wild West best. The Million Dollar Cowboy Bar has a long history in Jackson, with the building existing since the town's earliest years and the bar getting "Cowboy Bar" moniker in 1937. The bar's Cowboy motif comes along with a collection of Western memorabilia and a giant neon sign that calls you in.

25 N Cache St
Jackson, WY 83001

6. New Sheridan Hotel

231 W Colorado Ave, Telluride, CO 81320

Telluride's New Sheridan Hotel has been around for more than 100 years. The original wood structure burned after only a few years and was replaced with the current three-story brick building. The historic hotel reflects the wealth of Telluride's early mining days and has managed to retain a lot of the feel and details of that era while modernizing. The Historic Bar at street level is one of the most popular and iconic watering holes in all of ski country.

231 W Colorado Ave
Telluride, CO 81320

7. Wheeler Opera House

320 E Hyman Ave, Aspen, CO 81611

The Wheeler Opera House opened in 1889 even as the brick building was constructed through the 1890s. After a fire, it fell into decades of disuse but opened again in 1950 and now hosts all kinds of shows, events and festivals. It was also Aspen's first building to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

320 E Hyman Ave
Aspen, CO 81611

8. More Barn

605 Anglers Ct, Steamboat Springs, CO 80487

The More Barn rose into Steamboat skiing lore through necessity and a bit of luck. The resort was planning its marketing for the 1971-72 season and wanted a barn for the photo shoot. At the foot of Mount Werner, the More Barn provided the perfect backdrop for a cowboy and cowgirl riding with their skis. Eighteen inches of snow fell the night before the photo shoot, and the resulting poster has been synonymous with Steamboat's Western charm ever since.

605 Anglers Ct
Steamboat Springs, CO 80487

9. Hotel St. Bernard

15 Twining Rd, Taos Ski Valley, NM 87525

There still isn't a ton of lodging at the base of Taos Ski Valley, but Hotel St. Bernard was one of the first, luring visitors with the tradition of the ski week. The hotel was founded in 1960 by French-born Jean Mayer, who settled in the U.S. after working with the 10th Mountain Division in World War II. The hotel has been a constant through the growth of TSV, and even if a ski week is out of reach, the deck is a popular après spot that should be experienced.

15 Twining Rd
Taos Ski Valley, NM 87525

10. Stowe Community Church

137 Main St, Stowe, VT 05672

This New England colonial church building was completed in 1863 as a home for the Universalists but became one of the nation's first non-denominational churches when Stowe's congregations decided to merge. The spire of building's steeple poking above the foliage has become an iconic view of Stowe.

137 Main St
Stowe, VT 05672