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Mapping PBS's 10 Buildings That Changed America

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On Sunday evening, PBS will air a special called 10 Buildings That Changed America, featuring the structures that have altered the course of architecture, construction, and urban planning in this country over the past 225 years. Some, like Frank Lloyd Wright's Robie House, are already famous landmarks, while others, like the Southgate shopping mall in Edina, Minn., require further explanation. See all 10, mapped below, accompanied by a few fun facts.


· 10 Buildings That Changed America [PBS]
· All Curbed Maps [Curbed National]

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1. Virginia State Capitol

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1000 Bank Street
Richmond, VA 23219

The first in a long line of government buildings modeled after Greek and Roman temples, the Virginia State Capitol was completed in 1788 in Richmond, Va. Designed by Thomas Jefferson while the statesman was serving as ambassador to France, it is modeled after the Maison Carrée, a Roman temple in Nîmes.

2. Trinity Church

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206 Clarendon Street
Boston, MA 02116

Built by H.H. Richardson in 1877, Boston's Trinity Church established the soon wildly popular Richardsonian Romanesque style. Originally designed with a giant central tower, the building's height was reduced when engineers discovered that the infilled Back Bay couldn't support such a structure.

3. Wainwright Building

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111 North 7th Street
St. Louis, MO 63101

The first skyscraper that truly looked the part, the Wainwright Building was designed by the École des Beaux-Arts-trained American architect Louis Sullivan. Sullivan would go on to mentor Frank Lloyd Wright, but not before earning the moniker "The Father of Skyscrapers."

4. Robie House

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5757 South Woodlawn Avenue
Chicago, IL 60637

Regularly referred to as America's greatest architect, Frank Lloyd Wright built hundreds of impressive homes over his career, so why did PBS select the Robie House? Because it set the standard for Wright's famous Prairie style, provided a strong break from his earlier shingled works, and, well, because it had an attached three-car garage—"in 1910!"

5. Highland Park Ford Plant

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91 Manchester Parkway
Highland Park, MI 48203

Built in 1910 to designs by Albert Kahn, the Highland Park Ford Plant revolutionized American industry. With few interior columns and broad windows, it allowed for Ford's famous assembly line techniques.

6. Southdale Center

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10 Southdale Center, Southdale shopping Center
Minneapolis, MN 55435

The Southdale Center enjoys the dubious distinction of being America's first modern indoor mall, completed in 1956. Its architect, Austrian-born Victor Gruen, believed it would be a utopian vision for the American suburb, one that would liberate the masses from the "terror of the automobile."

7. Seagram Building

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375 Park Avenue
New York, NY 10152

On the recommendation of several prominent American architects, the daughter of distillery baron Samuel Bronfman selected Ludwig Mies van der Rohe to design Seagram's New York skyscraper. It was the model on which decades of glass skyscrapers were based.

8. Dulles International Airport

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1 Saarinen Circle, Dulles International Airport
Sterling, VA 20166

Prior to Eero Saarinen's Dulles terminal, few American airports "captured the magic of early jet travel." The sculptural, glass-walled masterpiece was a follow-up to Saarinen's TWA terminal in New York, but was the first airport in the world designed expressly for jet travel.

9. Vanna Venturi House

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8330 Millman Street
Philadelphia, PA 19118

Referred to as the "first postmodern building," Robert Venturi's Vanna Venturi House—built for his mother in 1964—set the stage for a movement away from the walls of glass and lack of ornamentation that had defined the '50s and '60s. Venturi declared "less is a bore," in response to the Mies van der Rohe edict "less is more," and that mantra is reflected in the positioning of windows, the concealed doorway, and an oversized chimney that actually houses a staircase.

10. Walt Disney Concert Hall

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111 South Grand Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90012

The lone West Coast entry on PBS's illustrious list, Frank Gehry's Walt Disney Concert Hall incorporates the sweeping metallic surfaces that have become the architect's hallmark. The sail-like forms disguise an inner "box," necessary for optimal acoustics.

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1. Virginia State Capitol

1000 Bank Street, Richmond, VA 23219

The first in a long line of government buildings modeled after Greek and Roman temples, the Virginia State Capitol was completed in 1788 in Richmond, Va. Designed by Thomas Jefferson while the statesman was serving as ambassador to France, it is modeled after the Maison Carrée, a Roman temple in Nîmes.

1000 Bank Street
Richmond, VA 23219

2. Trinity Church

206 Clarendon Street, Boston, MA 02116

Built by H.H. Richardson in 1877, Boston's Trinity Church established the soon wildly popular Richardsonian Romanesque style. Originally designed with a giant central tower, the building's height was reduced when engineers discovered that the infilled Back Bay couldn't support such a structure.

206 Clarendon Street
Boston, MA 02116

3. Wainwright Building

111 North 7th Street, St. Louis, MO 63101

The first skyscraper that truly looked the part, the Wainwright Building was designed by the École des Beaux-Arts-trained American architect Louis Sullivan. Sullivan would go on to mentor Frank Lloyd Wright, but not before earning the moniker "The Father of Skyscrapers."

111 North 7th Street
St. Louis, MO 63101

4. Robie House

5757 South Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637

Regularly referred to as America's greatest architect, Frank Lloyd Wright built hundreds of impressive homes over his career, so why did PBS select the Robie House? Because it set the standard for Wright's famous Prairie style, provided a strong break from his earlier shingled works, and, well, because it had an attached three-car garage—"in 1910!"

5757 South Woodlawn Avenue
Chicago, IL 60637

5. Highland Park Ford Plant

91 Manchester Parkway, Highland Park, MI 48203

Built in 1910 to designs by Albert Kahn, the Highland Park Ford Plant revolutionized American industry. With few interior columns and broad windows, it allowed for Ford's famous assembly line techniques.

91 Manchester Parkway
Highland Park, MI 48203

6. Southdale Center

10 Southdale Center, Southdale shopping Center, Minneapolis, MN 55435

The Southdale Center enjoys the dubious distinction of being America's first modern indoor mall, completed in 1956. Its architect, Austrian-born Victor Gruen, believed it would be a utopian vision for the American suburb, one that would liberate the masses from the "terror of the automobile."

10 Southdale Center, Southdale shopping Center
Minneapolis, MN 55435

7. Seagram Building

375 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10152

On the recommendation of several prominent American architects, the daughter of distillery baron Samuel Bronfman selected Ludwig Mies van der Rohe to design Seagram's New York skyscraper. It was the model on which decades of glass skyscrapers were based.

375 Park Avenue
New York, NY 10152

8. Dulles International Airport

1 Saarinen Circle, Dulles International Airport, Sterling, VA 20166

Prior to Eero Saarinen's Dulles terminal, few American airports "captured the magic of early jet travel." The sculptural, glass-walled masterpiece was a follow-up to Saarinen's TWA terminal in New York, but was the first airport in the world designed expressly for jet travel.

1 Saarinen Circle, Dulles International Airport
Sterling, VA 20166

9. Vanna Venturi House

8330 Millman Street, Philadelphia, PA 19118

Referred to as the "first postmodern building," Robert Venturi's Vanna Venturi House—built for his mother in 1964—set the stage for a movement away from the walls of glass and lack of ornamentation that had defined the '50s and '60s. Venturi declared "less is a bore," in response to the Mies van der Rohe edict "less is more," and that mantra is reflected in the positioning of windows, the concealed doorway, and an oversized chimney that actually houses a staircase.

8330 Millman Street
Philadelphia, PA 19118

10. Walt Disney Concert Hall

111 South Grand Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90012

The lone West Coast entry on PBS's illustrious list, Frank Gehry's Walt Disney Concert Hall incorporates the sweeping metallic surfaces that have become the architect's hallmark. The sail-like forms disguise an inner "box," necessary for optimal acoustics.

111 South Grand Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90012