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Mapping the Biggest Preservation Wins and Losses of 2013

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This year was not the greatest to be an architecturally significant midcentury structure. Not only did Richard Neutra's Gettysburg Cyclorama building get battle-axed, but also Chicago's Old Prentice Women's Hospital (a Brutalist icon) and—sniffle—JFK airport's 1960 Pan Am Worldport (pictured). Still, 2013's wrecking ball news is not all destruction and Miley Cyrus references (though it was mostly those things); there are a fair number of preservation wins to tally up as well. Below, the architectural preservation victories and heartbreaks of 2013, enumerated by the National Trust and mapped below.


· Mapping the Biggest Preservation Wins and Losses of 2012 [Curbed National]
· All Preservation Watch posts [Curbed National]
· Year in Curbed 2013 [Curbed National]

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1. WIN: Peavey Plaza

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1101 Nicollet Avenue, Nicollet Mall
Minneapolis, MN 55403

Designed by American landscape architect M. Paul Friedberg and completed in 1975, Peavey Plaza gets credited for reviving downtown Minneapolis and was apparently once called a "marvel of modernism" by the Cultural Landscape Foundation. In 2012, the city council voted to demolish the work, but since then preservationists managed to convince the powers-that-be that money should be spent to rehabilitate the plaza, not replace it. [Photo by Keri Pickett via The Cultural Landscape Foundation]

2. WIN: Jensen-Byrd Warehouse

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203 West Main Avenue
Spokane, WA 99201

This 104-year-old former warehouse in Spokane, Wash., has been derelict for a decade, ever since its neighbor, Washington State University, bought the place in 2004. WSU tried to convert the building into housing and commercial units, but without success, they considered selling it to a Texas developer, who wanted to tear the Jensen-Byrd Warehouse down. Preservationists rallied to get WSU to again consider reviving it. The plan now is for it to become a "gateway" building in between teh campus and University District. [Photo by PreserveWA/Flickr]

3. WIN: Fort Monroe

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151 Bernard Road, Fort Monroe National Monument
Fort Monroe, VA 23651

Earlier this month Virginia's governor green-lighted a plan to restore and revitalize the state's historic Fort Monroe, which hasn't been a proper military base since 2005, though the Army only moved out in 2011.

4. WIN: Stamford Post Office

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24 Camp Avenue
Stamford, CT 06907

Connecticut's Stamford Post Office—a 1916 Italian Renaissance-style building with arched windows, granite steps, vaulted ceilings, and marble floors—was slated for demolition by a real estate company that wanted to build a 20-story luxury apartment building in its place. Lawsuit loopholes (the Postal Service side-stepped federal environmental law requirements when selling it) ended up saving it. [Photo by Cathy Zuraw/Stamford Advocate]

5. WIN: Terminal Island

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1299 South Seaside Avenue
San Pedro, CA 90731

In August, the L.A. Board of Harbor Commissioners unanimously approved a plan to preserve the city's Terminal Island, a smidge of land most famously known to once be the home of 3,500 first- and second-generation Japanese people in the years leading up to WWII. In 1942, the neighborhood became the first in the country to be evacuated en masse after the signing of the executive order that interned Japanese-Americans after Pearl Harbor. It's also credited as "the location where America's tuna canning industry came of age," per the National Trust.

6. WIN: Wrigley Field

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1060 West Addison Street
Chicago, IL 60613

Home to the Chicago Cubs since 1916, Wrigley Field is also America's second-oldest baseball venue behind Boston's Fenway Park. Developers were considering demolishing the park, but after preservationists and Cubs purists went up in arms, the Cubs decided instead to renovate the place with the help of preservation architect T. Gunny Harboe, using city tax credits to restore the ballpark's historic character.

7. WIN: The First State National Monument

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Market Street
New Castle, DE 19720

In March, President Obama designated five new national monuments, each representing "a diverse chapter in American history." The First State National Monument, one of the two built structures on Obama's list, is the only Delaware project in the National Park System. It includes 1,000 acres of parkland outside of WIlmington, "The Green" in the center of historic Dover, and the New Castle Courthouse Complex (pictured).

8. WIN: Charles Young Buffalo Soldiers National Monument

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The other built structure to enjoy Obama-sanctioned conservancy: the Charles Young Buffalo Soldiers National Monument in Wilberforce, Ohio. The monument preserves the home of Charles Young, a black Renaissance man who graduated from West Point in 1889 to become a Colonel in the Army and superintendent at Sequoiz and King's Canyon national parks, according to NBC News.

9. WIN: Saenger Theatre

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1111 Canal Street
New Orleans, LA 70112

NOLA's 1927 Saenger Theatre and movie house has an interior that looks like a 15th-century Italian courtyard, with a ceiling painted like a night sky and faux stone structures flanking the seats. Per the National Trust, the theater "symbolized New Orleans', and America's, last flush of prosperity before the Great Depression." After it got converted to a performing arts space in 1970, the space played host to Johnny Carson, David Bowie, and Bill Cosby. Hurricane Katrina damaged it considerably (the basement was filled with more than 20 feet of water), but after eight years, the venue opened its doors again in October.

10. LOSS: Prentice Women's Hospital

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250 East Superior Street, Northwestern University: Chicago Campus
Chicago, IL 60611

Chicago's Old Prentice Women's Hospital, a 1975 work by Bertrand Goldberg, had its first few floors knocked out in October, as the demolition devised by Northwestern University and executed by Mayor Rahm Emanuel got off to a start—despite months of substantial public outcry against the demolition (even Frank Gehrychimed in). The architectural historian Michael R. Allen, writing for Next City, wondered if Chicago didn't experience a present-day "Penn Station Moment,"—basically the loss of a landmark that will rally people to the defense of endangered structures for years to come. As for what's to come here, it was just announced that Perkins+Will will design the Prentice replacement: a 600-square-foot, glassy biomedical research building.

11. LOSS: Cyclorama Building

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125 Taneytown Road, Gettysburg National Military Park
Gettysburg, PA 17325

Early this year, it came time to say final goodbyes to the Richard Neutra-designed Gettysburg Cyclorama building, the 1962 work that had been embroiled in a messy preservationist battle for 13 years. Civil War purists—who thought the design a blemish in the otherwise rather untouched landscape of Gettysburg, Pa.—ultimately beat out their 20th-century preservationist brethren, who at one point brought the starchitect's son Dion Neutra into the fray. Unlike the Kronish House, the famed modernist's SoCal design that was recently saved from the wrecking ball, Neutra's Cyclorama is plunked right atop historic, government-owned land, making it impossible for an anonymous, wealthy superhero to step in—just as one did a Frank Lloyd Wright commission in Phoenix last year. Prior to 2008, the structure—considered by some to be Neutra's crown jewel—housed the 377-foot-long "Battle of Gettysburg" painting, completed by French artist Paul Philippoteaux in 1883, but the work was ultimately transplanted to a visitors' center.

12. LOSS: Chinese Hospital

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845 Jackson Street
San Francisco, CA 94133

In April, San Francisco's Chinese Hospital, the last privately owned hospital in the city, was razed to make way for a new, state-of–the-art hospital addition in the heart of Chinatown. Per the National Trust, the original hospital, completed in 1925, was the only medical facility available to the local Chinese community.

13. LOSS: Charleston County Library

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404 King Street
Charleston, SC 29403

The South's very first racially integrated library, Charleston County Library on King Street, got its demolition papers in August. The National Trust says the building's contemporary design was meant to "signal openness and a break from racially charged traditional architecture of the past."

14. LOSS: The Pagoda Palace Theater

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1717 Powell Street
San Francisco, CA 94133

After 20 years of vacancy and a epoch-long preservation tangle, San Francisco's Pagoda Palace Theater was finally demolished this year. When it was built in 1907, the Pagoda was a vaudeville theater; it became a movie "palace" in the '20s. The newest owners plan to build (surprise!) condos on the site, with an exterior that will be "a replica of the original Pagoda." Sigh.

15. LOSS: World Port Terminal

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JFK Expressway & Van Wyck Expressway, John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK)
Queens, NY 11430

In August, JFK airport's Pan Am Worldport, the 1960 terminal that was an icon for techno-modernism and symbol of the Jet Age, began its long-awaited dismemberment. The "sometimes-iconic, sometimes-maligned" terminal, as Architizer once described it, closed officially on May 24, exactly 53 years after it opened. Per Gizmodo, American corporations oft featured the Worldport's 114-foot pizza-pan roof (part UFO, part brutalist cocktail umbrella, and all 1960s glamour) in ads of the Mad Men era. In June, the National Trust for Historic Preservation attempted to raise awareness about the impending doom of the building, but without any regulatory teeth to halt the Worldport's destruction, their efforts were fruitless. Workers began removing asbestos and lead paint earlier in the summer, and some say the Jetsons-style structure may not be completely dismantled until 2015.

16. LOSS: Univision Building

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Pancoast Street
San Antonio, TX 78204

San Antonio's 1955 Univision Building is considered to be the place where Spanish-language broadcasting began. The site, which began demo in November to make room for a $55M apartment development, housed the country's first full-time Spanish television station.

17. LOSS: St. Nicholas Croatian Church

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24 Maryland Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15209

According to the National Trust, the St. Nicholas Croatian Catholic Church was on the path toward destruction ever since the diocese halted service in 2000. It was the first Croatian Parish in the Western Hemisphere.

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1. WIN: Peavey Plaza

1101 Nicollet Avenue, Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis, MN 55403

Designed by American landscape architect M. Paul Friedberg and completed in 1975, Peavey Plaza gets credited for reviving downtown Minneapolis and was apparently once called a "marvel of modernism" by the Cultural Landscape Foundation. In 2012, the city council voted to demolish the work, but since then preservationists managed to convince the powers-that-be that money should be spent to rehabilitate the plaza, not replace it. [Photo by Keri Pickett via The Cultural Landscape Foundation]

1101 Nicollet Avenue, Nicollet Mall
Minneapolis, MN 55403

2. WIN: Jensen-Byrd Warehouse

203 West Main Avenue, Spokane, WA 99201

This 104-year-old former warehouse in Spokane, Wash., has been derelict for a decade, ever since its neighbor, Washington State University, bought the place in 2004. WSU tried to convert the building into housing and commercial units, but without success, they considered selling it to a Texas developer, who wanted to tear the Jensen-Byrd Warehouse down. Preservationists rallied to get WSU to again consider reviving it. The plan now is for it to become a "gateway" building in between teh campus and University District. [Photo by PreserveWA/Flickr]

203 West Main Avenue
Spokane, WA 99201

3. WIN: Fort Monroe

151 Bernard Road, Fort Monroe National Monument, Fort Monroe, VA 23651

Earlier this month Virginia's governor green-lighted a plan to restore and revitalize the state's historic Fort Monroe, which hasn't been a proper military base since 2005, though the Army only moved out in 2011.

151 Bernard Road, Fort Monroe National Monument
Fort Monroe, VA 23651

4. WIN: Stamford Post Office

24 Camp Avenue, Stamford, CT 06907

Connecticut's Stamford Post Office—a 1916 Italian Renaissance-style building with arched windows, granite steps, vaulted ceilings, and marble floors—was slated for demolition by a real estate company that wanted to build a 20-story luxury apartment building in its place. Lawsuit loopholes (the Postal Service side-stepped federal environmental law requirements when selling it) ended up saving it. [Photo by Cathy Zuraw/Stamford Advocate]

24 Camp Avenue
Stamford, CT 06907

5. WIN: Terminal Island

1299 South Seaside Avenue, San Pedro, CA 90731

In August, the L.A. Board of Harbor Commissioners unanimously approved a plan to preserve the city's Terminal Island, a smidge of land most famously known to once be the home of 3,500 first- and second-generation Japanese people in the years leading up to WWII. In 1942, the neighborhood became the first in the country to be evacuated en masse after the signing of the executive order that interned Japanese-Americans after Pearl Harbor. It's also credited as "the location where America's tuna canning industry came of age," per the National Trust.

1299 South Seaside Avenue
San Pedro, CA 90731

6. WIN: Wrigley Field

1060 West Addison Street, Chicago, IL 60613

Home to the Chicago Cubs since 1916, Wrigley Field is also America's second-oldest baseball venue behind Boston's Fenway Park. Developers were considering demolishing the park, but after preservationists and Cubs purists went up in arms, the Cubs decided instead to renovate the place with the help of preservation architect T. Gunny Harboe, using city tax credits to restore the ballpark's historic character.

1060 West Addison Street
Chicago, IL 60613

7. WIN: The First State National Monument

Market Street, New Castle, DE 19720

In March, President Obama designated five new national monuments, each representing "a diverse chapter in American history." The First State National Monument, one of the two built structures on Obama's list, is the only Delaware project in the National Park System. It includes 1,000 acres of parkland outside of WIlmington, "The Green" in the center of historic Dover, and the New Castle Courthouse Complex (pictured).

Market Street
New Castle, DE 19720

8. WIN: Charles Young Buffalo Soldiers National Monument

U.S. Route 42 East, OH

The other built structure to enjoy Obama-sanctioned conservancy: the Charles Young Buffalo Soldiers National Monument in Wilberforce, Ohio. The monument preserves the home of Charles Young, a black Renaissance man who graduated from West Point in 1889 to become a Colonel in the Army and superintendent at Sequoiz and King's Canyon national parks, according to NBC News.

9. WIN: Saenger Theatre

1111 Canal Street, New Orleans, LA 70112

NOLA's 1927 Saenger Theatre and movie house has an interior that looks like a 15th-century Italian courtyard, with a ceiling painted like a night sky and faux stone structures flanking the seats. Per the National Trust, the theater "symbolized New Orleans', and America's, last flush of prosperity before the Great Depression." After it got converted to a performing arts space in 1970, the space played host to Johnny Carson, David Bowie, and Bill Cosby. Hurricane Katrina damaged it considerably (the basement was filled with more than 20 feet of water), but after eight years, the venue opened its doors again in October.

1111 Canal Street
New Orleans, LA 70112

10. LOSS: Prentice Women's Hospital

250 East Superior Street, Northwestern University: Chicago Campus, Chicago, IL 60611

Chicago's Old Prentice Women's Hospital, a 1975 work by Bertrand Goldberg, had its first few floors knocked out in October, as the demolition devised by Northwestern University and executed by Mayor Rahm Emanuel got off to a start—despite months of substantial public outcry against the demolition (even Frank Gehrychimed in). The architectural historian Michael R. Allen, writing for Next City, wondered if Chicago didn't experience a present-day "Penn Station Moment,"—basically the loss of a landmark that will rally people to the defense of endangered structures for years to come. As for what's to come here, it was just announced that Perkins+Will will design the Prentice replacement: a 600-square-foot, glassy biomedical research building.

250 East Superior Street, Northwestern University: Chicago Campus
Chicago, IL 60611

11. LOSS: Cyclorama Building

125 Taneytown Road, Gettysburg National Military Park, Gettysburg, PA 17325

Early this year, it came time to say final goodbyes to the Richard Neutra-designed Gettysburg Cyclorama building, the 1962 work that had been embroiled in a messy preservationist battle for 13 years. Civil War purists—who thought the design a blemish in the otherwise rather untouched landscape of Gettysburg, Pa.—ultimately beat out their 20th-century preservationist brethren, who at one point brought the starchitect's son Dion Neutra into the fray. Unlike the Kronish House, the famed modernist's SoCal design that was recently saved from the wrecking ball, Neutra's Cyclorama is plunked right atop historic, government-owned land, making it impossible for an anonymous, wealthy superhero to step in—just as one did a Frank Lloyd Wright commission in Phoenix last year. Prior to 2008, the structure—considered by some to be Neutra's crown jewel—housed the 377-foot-long "Battle of Gettysburg" painting, completed by French artist Paul Philippoteaux in 1883, but the work was ultimately transplanted to a visitors' center.

125 Taneytown Road, Gettysburg National Military Park
Gettysburg, PA 17325

12. LOSS: Chinese Hospital

845 Jackson Street, San Francisco, CA 94133

In April, San Francisco's Chinese Hospital, the last privately owned hospital in the city, was razed to make way for a new, state-of–the-art hospital addition in the heart of Chinatown. Per the National Trust, the original hospital, completed in 1925, was the only medical facility available to the local Chinese community.

845 Jackson Street
San Francisco, CA 94133

13. LOSS: Charleston County Library

404 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

The South's very first racially integrated library, Charleston County Library on King Street, got its demolition papers in August. The National Trust says the building's contemporary design was meant to "signal openness and a break from racially charged traditional architecture of the past."

404 King Street
Charleston, SC 29403

14. LOSS: The Pagoda Palace Theater

1717 Powell Street, San Francisco, CA 94133

After 20 years of vacancy and a epoch-long preservation tangle, San Francisco's Pagoda Palace Theater was finally demolished this year. When it was built in 1907, the Pagoda was a vaudeville theater; it became a movie "palace" in the '20s. The newest owners plan to build (surprise!) condos on the site, with an exterior that will be "a replica of the original Pagoda." Sigh.

1717 Powell Street
San Francisco, CA 94133

15. LOSS: World Port Terminal

JFK Expressway & Van Wyck Expressway, John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), Queens, NY 11430

In August, JFK airport's Pan Am Worldport, the 1960 terminal that was an icon for techno-modernism and symbol of the Jet Age, began its long-awaited dismemberment. The "sometimes-iconic, sometimes-maligned" terminal, as Architizer once described it, closed officially on May 24, exactly 53 years after it opened. Per Gizmodo, American corporations oft featured the Worldport's 114-foot pizza-pan roof (part UFO, part brutalist cocktail umbrella, and all 1960s glamour) in ads of the Mad Men era. In June, the National Trust for Historic Preservation attempted to raise awareness about the impending doom of the building, but without any regulatory teeth to halt the Worldport's destruction, their efforts were fruitless. Workers began removing asbestos and lead paint earlier in the summer, and some say the Jetsons-style structure may not be completely dismantled until 2015.

JFK Expressway & Van Wyck Expressway, John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK)
Queens, NY 11430

16. LOSS: Univision Building

Pancoast Street, San Antonio, TX 78204

San Antonio's 1955 Univision Building is considered to be the place where Spanish-language broadcasting began. The site, which began demo in November to make room for a $55M apartment development, housed the country's first full-time Spanish television station.

Pancoast Street
San Antonio, TX 78204

17. LOSS: St. Nicholas Croatian Church

24 Maryland Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15209

According to the National Trust, the St. Nicholas Croatian Catholic Church was on the path toward destruction ever since the diocese halted service in 2000. It was the first Croatian Parish in the Western Hemisphere.

24 Maryland Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15209