clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile

MTV’s ‘Real World’: Every Single Outrageous House, Mapped

Where reality TV was born

View as Map

When 'The Real World' debuted in 1992, reality TV was in its infancy, people used pagers, and MTV still aired music videos. The idea was novel: throw seven strangers into a house for several months and film their every move.Created by Mary-Ellis Bunim and Jonathan Murray, no one in 1992 could anticipate that the scripted reality show would become the longest-running program in MTV history. And for a generation of youths and young adults watching the early seasons, the show was a visual introduction into sex, racism, alcohol, religion, and politics.

The Real World also boasted some serious real estate eye candy. Although the show's goal was to find out what happened "when people stop being polite, and start getting real," the show's homes increasingly became over-the-top caricatures of the cities they resided in—fake volcanoes in the Hawaii beach house, ski chairs in the Denver loft, tiki bars in San Diego. The Real World houses weren't so much real as they were fulfilling the housing fantasies of a generation of viewers dreaming of leaving home.

The show's producers also preferred to film in locations that were "up-and-coming" or rapidly changing, causing many observers (and critics) to accuse the Real World of encouraging gentrification. The Real World cast lived in lofts, penthouses, piers, and city condos, all filled with fishtanks and pool tables and IKEA furniture. But despite the illusion of urban grit, the cast members were always sheltered from the reality of their neighborhoods, whether through security guards or, as the show grew ever more popular, literal fences.

In total, there have been 31 seasons of the Real World, and the 32nd season is currently filming in Seattle. We've rounded up each and every house, from the original Soho loft in New York City to the show's luxurious Las Vegas penthouses. Whether you watched one season or 20, it's a trip down reality show memory lane.

Read More

Season 1: New York (1992)

Copy Link
a 1,500-square-foot mezzanine, a 17-foot-tall original exposed brick vault ceiling, six Corinthian columns, and its original marble flooring.

Season 2: Los Angeles (1993)

Copy Link

The season two cast headed to Venice Beach, California to live in this three-story, 4,520-square-foot, four bedroom abode only one block east of the ocean. Real World pros will remember that the season started with Tami and Dominic picking up Jon and driving a Winnebago all the way to LA. The footage was so compelling it inspired MTV to later create Road Rules. The season was also notable because after a physical altercation with Tami Roman, David was asked to leave the show early. The interior of the house looks much different than during filming, but if you want to pretend you're a Real World cast member, you can rent the master bedroom on Airbnb.

Season 3: San Francisco (1994)

Copy Link

The third season of the Real World is arguably its most memorable; cast members included HIV-positive Pedro Zamora and the series' most controversial member ever, Puck Rainey, who was booted out of the house halfway through the season. Not only was Pedro one of the first openly gay men with AIDS featured on television, but his commitment ceremony with Sean Sasser was the first gay union ever aired. They all lived in this four-story, 3,705-square-foot condo just one block from the curvy part of Lombard Street. In 2014 the two-bedroom place was renting for $5,800, but don't expect the interior to look like it did during filming. In 2000 a fire caused $2 million in damages and resulted in a complete renovation.

Season 4: London (1995)

Copy Link

For the Real World's first international season, MTV chose a four-bedroom flat in Noting Hill, the posh neighborhood not far from the Kensington Gardens. While London couldn't match the antics of the previous season in San Francisco (thanks, Puck), the season was notable because it was the only cast to be largely non-American, with three Americans, two Britons, a German, and an Australian. Oh, and Neil Forrester had that whole tongue-biting incident.

Season 5: Miami (1996)

Copy Link

Season 5 headed to Miami's South Beach, specifically the Rivo Alta Island neighborhood. The cast lived in this 4,976-square-foot house with 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, a pool, and 125 feet of water frontage on Biscayne Bay. While the Miami season was notable for all its pool time, it was also the first season in which the housemates were given $50,000 startup to begin a business.

Season 6: Boston (1997)

Copy Link

The Real World Boston took place in one of the show's most iconic homes: a 2,500-square-foot brick firehouse originally built in 1949. Located in Beacon Hill, the firehouse was also one of the smallest Real World digs, with two double bedrooms and one triple bedroom. Despite the home's small stature, the 6th season was full of drama courtesy of Montana, Genesis, Syrus and crew.

Season 7: Seattle (1998)

Copy Link

When the Real World headed to Seattle, it chose Pier 70 for the newest over-the-top house. The 140,000-square-foot pier was originally built in 1902 as one of the largest docks on the waterfront, and MTV had to obtain a special permit in order to allow the cast to live there. Because they had so much space to work with, the Seattle house included amenities like a huge cobblestone patio, a sunken living room, a hot tub, and a rock climbing wall. The pier is the site of one of the show's most iconic moments when Stephen Williams slapped cast member Irene McGee as she moved out of the house. But don't expect the pier to look anything like it did during filming; it's been completely remodeled.

Season 8: Hawaii (1999)

Copy Link

Following the Miami, Boston, and Seattle seasons, the Real World homes increasingly became caricatures of the cities they resided in. When the 8th season headed to Hawaii, the producers chose a 4,095-square-foot house on Oahu called the Diamond Head House. The cast lived in a three-bedroom, four-bath abode that came with a gym and was renting for $10,000/month at the time of production. From a fire-breathing volcano in the middle of the pool to a cave bedroom, the design was over-the-top, kitschy "Hawaiian." It was also a house of drama: one of the season's most notable moments was when Ruthie Alcaide left the house in order to seek treatment for alcohol.

Season 9: New Orleans (2000)

Copy Link

When heading to New Orleans, MTV chose to house the cast in the gorgeous 7,000-square-foot Belfort Mansion. Built sometime in the 1870s and eventually converted into apartments in the 1930s, MTV converted the mansion into an example of New Orleans stereotypes. There were Mardi Gras beads everywhere, neon signs, a "Voodoo prayer room", and a music bedroom that was supposed to pay homage to the city's jazz scene.

Season 10: New York (2001)

Copy Link

For the Real World's 10th anniversary, the crew headed back to New York City to this 8,000-square-foot, four-story building in the West Village, just over a mile from the SoHo loft used in the filming of the first season. The cast used the 3rd and 4th floors including the penthouse and roof deck. In 2013, the town home and all of its quirky decor went on the market for $22 million.

Season 11: Chicago (2002)

Copy Link

When the Real World headed to Chicago for the first time, producers chose a converted bookstore/coffeehouse in the city's Wicker Park neighborhood. While the season supplied plenty of drama in the house, much of the discussion around the Chicago loft was off-camera. By 2002, MTV had come under fire as an "advertisement for gentrification,"given the company's tendency to film the show in up-and-coming, "hip" neighborhoods. At least 15 people were arrested during protests in July 2001 after chanting "We're real, you're not" in front of the Chicago loft. Although originally hailed as a ground-breaking show that dealt with serious issues of race, culture, and identity, the Real World backlash had begun.

Season 12: Las Vegas (2002-2003)

Copy Link

In 2002 the Real World descended on Las Vegas, embracing the show's over-the-top drinking and partying antics by locating to Sin City. For many this was the end of the "real" Real World, as the Las Vegas cast seemed more concerned with how many shots they could stomach than discussing life issues. But the first Las Vegas season was tremendously successful, in large part because the Palms Casino demolished six rooms at a cost of $2 million to create the 3,000-square-foot Real World Suite. The suite is the only former Real World residence that remains intact and available for reservations, to the tune of $11,000 per night.

Season 13: Paris (2003)

Copy Link

Paris was the second international location of the Real World, and as is fitting for a trip to France, the cast stayed in a 5,382-square-foot villa built in 1869. Instead of lodging directly in the city, the villa was located about 10 miles outside of Paris. According to RealWorldHouses.com, fake walls were built to protect the villa's 18-karat gilding on the original surfaces.

Season 14: San Diego (2004)

Copy Link

When the 14th season of the Real World chose San Diego as its filming location, producers took the Blue Crab Seafood restaurant and an adjacent marine supply company and converted it into a custom-designed, two-story house. The building overlooked the America's Cup Harbor and MTV added a ton of kitschy California elements: the Real World house featured a Volleyball court, surfboard storage room, a grass deck with tiki bar, and a sand deck with lounge chairs.

Season 15: Philadelphia (2004-2005)

Copy Link

Built in 1902 by Philly architect John T. Brugger as the Union Bank of Philadelphia, the building for MTV's 15th Real World season later became the Girard Corn Exchange National Bank, Seaman's Church Institute, and then, most infamously, the Real World House in 2004. Although MTV added lots of fish tanks and the requisite billiard room, much of the former bank's neoclassical lines shone through during filming. The indoor hot tub, however, was a special Real World addition. Ten years after filming, the building sold for $5 million to Christopher Aker to become the headquarters of a tech company.

Season 16: Austin (2005)

Copy Link

The 16th version of the Real World won "favorite season" at a 2008 awards bash, and the cast lived in approximately 8,000 square feet of a much larger warehouse. The renovated space used well known Austin-based designer Joel Mozersky to create spaces like the "guava cactus bedroom," a bright red kitchen with light up neon cowboy signage, a hot tub room with fake palm trees, and an indoor pool. After filming, the warehouse was renovated into a Rio Grande restaurant, and is now home to the Vince Young Steakhouse, which opened in November 2010.

Season 17: Key West (2006)

Copy Link

By the 17th season of the Real World, cast members had come to expect larger than life houses. Key West delivered with a 6,000-square-foot Mediterranean-style mansion on the water. Amenities included a tennis court, racquetball court, gym, pool, and open dock. The home originally also had an indoor pool, but producers replaced the pool with a sunken living room pit adjacent to the hot tub. During filming the cast had to evacuate to West Palm Beach thanks to Hurricane Rita, and when Hurricane Wilma hit they had to evacuate to Ft. Lauderdale and Orlando. Like the Las Vegas Palms suite, this Real World House is one of the few available for vacation rentals.

Season 18: Denver (2006-2007)

Copy Link

The Denver Real World filmed in bustling LoDo, then an up-and-coming neighborhood anchored by Coors Field to its north. The Denver building was the first Real World house that Bunim-Murray Productions purchased for the filming of the series. As was now typical of the Real World digs, designers filled the house with stereotypical Colorado-themed items. There was were ski chairlifts as furniture, half of a jeep coming out of a wall, and mountain murals painted everywhere. The season was most memorable for Brooke LaBarbera's legendary meltdown, an event that goes down as the Real World's biggest freak out.

Season 19: Sydney (2007-2008)

Copy Link

The Real World headed down under for the 19th season. The cast lived in the 20,000-square-foot former OneSport World Building at the southern end of Darling Harbour, a pedestrian area on the western side of Sydney. Because the building was demolished and replaced with a $500 million development soon after filming in 2008, there are few photos of the original Real World house.

Season 20: Hollywood (2008)

Copy Link

When the Real World returned to California for the 20th season, it made the state the most commonly used in the series. The cast of 9 (two of the original members left the show) lived at Stage 20 located at Columbia Square. The building is part of a huge complex and the house was the first to incorporate environmentally friendly choices like a solar-heated swimming pool, Energy Star appliances, bamboo flooring, a computer powered by an exercise bicycle, paperless toilets and a hybrid car.

Season 21: Brooklyn (2009)

Copy Link

Proving that there was never a pier they didn't like, the Real World producers took the 21st season to an old red-brick warehouse at the end of Pier 41 in Brooklyn's Red Hook. The location was a bit isolated, but it provided jaw-dropping views of the New York Harbor and Statue of Liberty. Highlights of the design included a Coney Island bedroom, although the Brooklyn house didn't have as many over-the-top amenities as previous houses. In 2011 the property was turned into a wedding venue.

Season 22: Cancun (2009)

Copy Link

The 22nd season of the Real World was the only season filmed in Mexico and featured 8 cast members living at the ME Cancun hotel. Located in the hotel zone, the property converted 15 hotel rooms into the cast's suite and it's one of the few Real World properties you can rent to stay in on vacation.

Season 23: D.C. (2009-2010)

Copy Link

Cast members in the Real World Washington DC lived in a 10,800-square-foot house in Dupont Circle. The four-story brownstone mansion was originally build in 1891 and producers renovated the first two floors for the cast while the production crew occupied the upper two floors. The home's design featured plenty of red, white, and blue coloring, bedrooms named after presidents, a "LoveSac Lounge" with photos of Lady Liberty, and statues of eagles.

Season 24: New Orleans (2010)

Copy Link

The Real World's second trip to New Orleans landed in the Uptown neighborhood in an almost 10,000-square-foot mansion. But this wasn't the home's only TV appearance; the mansion also appeared on MTV Cribs. The interior design featured a graveyard bedroom, a saxophone chandelier, a Mardi Gras bedroom complete with huge beads and masks, and an idyllic pool.

Season 25: Las Vegas (2011)

Copy Link

While the first Real World Vegas penthouse was at the Palms, this time MTV headed to the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino to renovate 8 guest rooms into a 3-bedroom, 3-bath suite. Like the other hotel properties from the Real World, the suite is still available to the public to rent.

Season 26: San Diego (2011)

Copy Link

The Real World's return to San Diego took cast members to La Jolla, a pricey suburb of San Diego. Prior to filming, the eight-bedroom house rented for $50,000 per month, a testament to the property's beachside location. Along with its usual bright colors, the house also featured a tennis deck and ocean-view pool.

Season 27: St. Thomas (2012)

Copy Link

In one of the most gorgeous Real World locations ever, the 27th season filmed in St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands. The cast lived on Hassel Island, most of which is property of the Virgin Islands National Park and across the bay from Charlotte Amalie, the capital city. The location required members to use motor boats to get across the bay, but it was a small price to pay for the home's waterfront location, gazebo, pool, and private dock.

Season 28: Portland (2013)

Copy Link

Real World Portland featured a 20,000-square-foot building that was originally listed for $3.25 million prior to filming. In an ode to the Pacific Northwest, there was a plethora of plaid, a birdhouse bedroom, lots of reclaimed wood, and hipster-inspired furniture like a ping pong dining room table.

Season 29: San Francisco (2014)

Copy Link

For the third time, the Real World located to San Francisco for the 29th season. Producers chose to house the cast in the former Avalon Ballroom loft, a Bill Graham venue that played host to music legends in the 1960s. The design featured lots of geometric patterns and the Real World's usual bright color pattern, but the biggest news of the season was the show's format change. In an effort to combat waning ratings, the producers brought the cast member's exes into the house.

Season 30: Chicago (2014-2015)

Copy Link

Real World producers chose an empty warehouse in West Loop for their second trip to Chicago. The West Loop neighborhood has undergone big changes in the past few years, with new lofts, restaurants, and night clubs coming in. After filming, the show held a garage sale to sell the used fixtures and items.

Season 31: Las Vegas (2016)

Copy Link

The previous two seasons filmed in Las Vegas had featured well-known hotels near the strip. But for the 31st rendition, producers chose to convert a penthouse suite at the Gold Spike in Downtown Las Vegas. The 5,000-square-foot suite features 3 bedrooms, 3 rooftop patios, and the requisite pool table. It's available to rent by the night.

Season 32: Seattle (Currently Filming)

Copy Link

After heading back to other cities multiple times, it's now Seattle's turn to host the Real World for the second time. This time, the cast will live in up-and-coming Capitol Hill where the producers plan to spend $50,000 in alterations on the Ballou Wright building. Filming is currently underway.

Loading comments...

Season 1: New York (1992)

a 1,500-square-foot mezzanine, a 17-foot-tall original exposed brick vault ceiling, six Corinthian columns, and its original marble flooring.

Season 2: Los Angeles (1993)

The season two cast headed to Venice Beach, California to live in this three-story, 4,520-square-foot, four bedroom abode only one block east of the ocean. Real World pros will remember that the season started with Tami and Dominic picking up Jon and driving a Winnebago all the way to LA. The footage was so compelling it inspired MTV to later create Road Rules. The season was also notable because after a physical altercation with Tami Roman, David was asked to leave the show early. The interior of the house looks much different than during filming, but if you want to pretend you're a Real World cast member, you can rent the master bedroom on Airbnb.

Season 3: San Francisco (1994)

The third season of the Real World is arguably its most memorable; cast members included HIV-positive Pedro Zamora and the series' most controversial member ever, Puck Rainey, who was booted out of the house halfway through the season. Not only was Pedro one of the first openly gay men with AIDS featured on television, but his commitment ceremony with Sean Sasser was the first gay union ever aired. They all lived in this four-story, 3,705-square-foot condo just one block from the curvy part of Lombard Street. In 2014 the two-bedroom place was renting for $5,800, but don't expect the interior to look like it did during filming. In 2000 a fire caused $2 million in damages and resulted in a complete renovation.

Season 4: London (1995)

For the Real World's first international season, MTV chose a four-bedroom flat in Noting Hill, the posh neighborhood not far from the Kensington Gardens. While London couldn't match the antics of the previous season in San Francisco (thanks, Puck), the season was notable because it was the only cast to be largely non-American, with three Americans, two Britons, a German, and an Australian. Oh, and Neil Forrester had that whole tongue-biting incident.

Season 5: Miami (1996)

Season 5 headed to Miami's South Beach, specifically the Rivo Alta Island neighborhood. The cast lived in this 4,976-square-foot house with 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, a pool, and 125 feet of water frontage on Biscayne Bay. While the Miami season was notable for all its pool time, it was also the first season in which the housemates were given $50,000 startup to begin a business.

Season 6: Boston (1997)

The Real World Boston took place in one of the show's most iconic homes: a 2,500-square-foot brick firehouse originally built in 1949. Located in Beacon Hill, the firehouse was also one of the smallest Real World digs, with two double bedrooms and one triple bedroom. Despite the home's small stature, the 6th season was full of drama courtesy of Montana, Genesis, Syrus and crew.

Season 7: Seattle (1998)

When the Real World headed to Seattle, it chose Pier 70 for the newest over-the-top house. The 140,000-square-foot pier was originally built in 1902 as one of the largest docks on the waterfront, and MTV had to obtain a special permit in order to allow the cast to live there. Because they had so much space to work with, the Seattle house included amenities like a huge cobblestone patio, a sunken living room, a hot tub, and a rock climbing wall. The pier is the site of one of the show's most iconic moments when Stephen Williams slapped cast member Irene McGee as she moved out of the house. But don't expect the pier to look anything like it did during filming; it's been completely remodeled.

Season 8: Hawaii (1999)

Following the Miami, Boston, and Seattle seasons, the Real World homes increasingly became caricatures of the cities they resided in. When the 8th season headed to Hawaii, the producers chose a 4,095-square-foot house on Oahu called the Diamond Head House. The cast lived in a three-bedroom, four-bath abode that came with a gym and was renting for $10,000/month at the time of production. From a fire-breathing volcano in the middle of the pool to a cave bedroom, the design was over-the-top, kitschy "Hawaiian." It was also a house of drama: one of the season's most notable moments was when Ruthie Alcaide left the house in order to seek treatment for alcohol.

Season 9: New Orleans (2000)

When heading to New Orleans, MTV chose to house the cast in the gorgeous 7,000-square-foot Belfort Mansion. Built sometime in the 1870s and eventually converted into apartments in the 1930s, MTV converted the mansion into an example of New Orleans stereotypes. There were Mardi Gras beads everywhere, neon signs, a "Voodoo prayer room", and a music bedroom that was supposed to pay homage to the city's jazz scene.

Season 10: New York (2001)

For the Real World's 10th anniversary, the crew headed back to New York City to this 8,000-square-foot, four-story building in the West Village, just over a mile from the SoHo loft used in the filming of the first season. The cast used the 3rd and 4th floors including the penthouse and roof deck. In 2013, the town home and all of its quirky decor went on the market for $22 million.

Season 11: Chicago (2002)

When the Real World headed to Chicago for the first time, producers chose a converted bookstore/coffeehouse in the city's Wicker Park neighborhood. While the season supplied plenty of drama in the house, much of the discussion around the Chicago loft was off-camera. By 2002, MTV had come under fire as an "advertisement for gentrification,"given the company's tendency to film the show in up-and-coming, "hip" neighborhoods. At least 15 people were arrested during protests in July 2001 after chanting "We're real, you're not" in front of the Chicago loft. Although originally hailed as a ground-breaking show that dealt with serious issues of race, culture, and identity, the Real World backlash had begun.

Season 12: Las Vegas (2002-2003)

In 2002 the Real World descended on Las Vegas, embracing the show's over-the-top drinking and partying antics by locating to Sin City. For many this was the end of the "real" Real World, as the Las Vegas cast seemed more concerned with how many shots they could stomach than discussing life issues. But the first Las Vegas season was tremendously successful, in large part because the Palms Casino demolished six rooms at a cost of $2 million to create the 3,000-square-foot Real World Suite. The suite is the only former Real World residence that remains intact and available for reservations, to the tune of $11,000 per night.

Season 13: Paris (2003)

Paris was the second international location of the Real World, and as is fitting for a trip to France, the cast stayed in a 5,382-square-foot villa built in 1869. Instead of lodging directly in the city, the villa was located about 10 miles outside of Paris. According to RealWorldHouses.com, fake walls were built to protect the villa's 18-karat gilding on the original surfaces.

Season 14: San Diego (2004)

When the 14th season of the Real World chose San Diego as its filming location, producers took the Blue Crab Seafood restaurant and an adjacent marine supply company and converted it into a custom-designed, two-story house. The building overlooked the America's Cup Harbor and MTV added a ton of kitschy California elements: the Real World house featured a Volleyball court, surfboard storage room, a grass deck with tiki bar, and a sand deck with lounge chairs.

Season 15: Philadelphia (2004-2005)

Built in 1902 by Philly architect John T. Brugger as the Union Bank of Philadelphia, the building for MTV's 15th Real World season later became the Girard Corn Exchange National Bank, Seaman's Church Institute, and then, most infamously, the Real World House in 2004. Although MTV added lots of fish tanks and the requisite billiard room, much of the former bank's neoclassical lines shone through during filming. The indoor hot tub, however, was a special Real World addition. Ten years after filming, the building sold for $5 million to Christopher Aker to become the headquarters of a tech company.

Season 16: Austin (2005)

The 16th version of the Real World won "favorite season" at a 2008 awards bash, and the cast lived in approximately 8,000 square feet of a much larger warehouse. The renovated space used well known Austin-based designer Joel Mozersky to create spaces like the "guava cactus bedroom," a bright red kitchen with light up neon cowboy signage, a hot tub room with fake palm trees, and an indoor pool. After filming, the warehouse was renovated into a Rio Grande restaurant, and is now home to the Vince Young Steakhouse, which opened in November 2010.

Season 17: Key West (2006)

By the 17th season of the Real World, cast members had come to expect larger than life houses. Key West delivered with a 6,000-square-foot Mediterranean-style mansion on the water. Amenities included a tennis court, racquetball court, gym, pool, and open dock. The home originally also had an indoor pool, but producers replaced the pool with a sunken living room pit adjacent to the hot tub. During filming the cast had to evacuate to West Palm Beach thanks to Hurricane Rita, and when Hurricane Wilma hit they had to evacuate to Ft. Lauderdale and Orlando. Like the Las Vegas Palms suite, this Real World House is one of the few available for vacation rentals.

Season 18: Denver (2006-2007)

The Denver Real World filmed in bustling LoDo, then an up-and-coming neighborhood anchored by Coors Field to its north. The Denver building was the first Real World house that Bunim-Murray Productions purchased for the filming of the series. As was now typical of the Real World digs, designers filled the house with stereotypical Colorado-themed items. There was were ski chairlifts as furniture, half of a jeep coming out of a wall, and mountain murals painted everywhere. The season was most memorable for Brooke LaBarbera's legendary meltdown, an event that goes down as the Real World's biggest freak out.

Season 19: Sydney (2007-2008)

The Real World headed down under for the 19th season. The cast lived in the 20,000-square-foot former OneSport World Building at the southern end of Darling Harbour, a pedestrian area on the western side of Sydney. Because the building was demolished and replaced with a $500 million development soon after filming in 2008, there are few photos of the original Real World house.

Season 20: Hollywood (2008)

When the Real World returned to California for the 20th season, it made the state the most commonly used in the series. The cast of 9 (two of the original members left the show) lived at Stage 20 located at Columbia Square. The building is part of a huge complex and the house was the first to incorporate environmentally friendly choices like a solar-heated swimming pool, Energy Star appliances, bamboo flooring, a computer powered by an exercise bicycle, paperless toilets and a hybrid car.

Season 21: Brooklyn (2009)

Proving that there was never a pier they didn't like, the Real World producers took the 21st season to an old red-brick warehouse at the end of Pier 41 in Brooklyn's Red Hook. The location was a bit isolated, but it provided jaw-dropping views of the New York Harbor and Statue of Liberty. Highlights of the design included a Coney Island bedroom, although the Brooklyn house didn't have as many over-the-top amenities as previous houses. In 2011 the property was turned into a wedding venue.

Season 22: Cancun (2009)

The 22nd season of the Real World was the only season filmed in Mexico and featured 8 cast members living at the ME Cancun hotel. Located in the hotel zone, the property converted 15 hotel rooms into the cast's suite and it's one of the few Real World properties you can rent to stay in on vacation.

Season 23: D.C. (2009-2010)

Cast members in the Real World Washington DC lived in a 10,800-square-foot house in Dupont Circle. The four-story brownstone mansion was originally build in 1891 and producers renovated the first two floors for the cast while the production crew occupied the upper two floors. The home's design featured plenty of red, white, and blue coloring, bedrooms named after presidents, a "LoveSac Lounge" with photos of Lady Liberty, and statues of eagles.

Season 24: New Orleans (2010)

The Real World's second trip to New Orleans landed in the Uptown neighborhood in an almost 10,000-square-foot mansion. But this wasn't the home's only TV appearance; the mansion also appeared on MTV Cribs. The interior design featured a graveyard bedroom, a saxophone chandelier, a Mardi Gras bedroom complete with huge beads and masks, and an idyllic pool.

Season 25: Las Vegas (2011)

While the first Real World Vegas penthouse was at the Palms, this time MTV headed to the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino to renovate 8 guest rooms into a 3-bedroom, 3-bath suite. Like the other hotel properties from the Real World, the suite is still available to the public to rent.

Season 26: San Diego (2011)

The Real World's return to San Diego took cast members to La Jolla, a pricey suburb of San Diego. Prior to filming, the eight-bedroom house rented for $50,000 per month, a testament to the property's beachside location. Along with its usual bright colors, the house also featured a tennis deck and ocean-view pool.

Season 27: St. Thomas (2012)

In one of the most gorgeous Real World locations ever, the 27th season filmed in St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands. The cast lived on Hassel Island, most of which is property of the Virgin Islands National Park and across the bay from Charlotte Amalie, the capital city. The location required members to use motor boats to get across the bay, but it was a small price to pay for the home's waterfront location, gazebo, pool, and private dock.

Season 28: Portland (2013)

Real World Portland featured a 20,000-square-foot building that was originally listed for $3.25 million prior to filming. In an ode to the Pacific Northwest, there was a plethora of plaid, a birdhouse bedroom, lots of reclaimed wood, and hipster-inspired furniture like a ping pong dining room table.

Season 29: San Francisco (2014)

For the third time, the Real World located to San Francisco for the 29th season. Producers chose to house the cast in the former Avalon Ballroom loft, a Bill Graham venue that played host to music legends in the 1960s. The design featured lots of geometric patterns and the Real World's usual bright color pattern, but the biggest news of the season was the show's format change. In an effort to combat waning ratings, the producers brought the cast member's exes into the house.

Season 30: Chicago (2014-2015)

Real World producers chose an empty warehouse in West Loop for their second trip to Chicago. The West Loop neighborhood has undergone big changes in the past few years, with new lofts, restaurants, and night clubs coming in. After filming, the show held a garage sale to sell the used fixtures and items.

Season 31: Las Vegas (2016)

The previous two seasons filmed in Las Vegas had featured well-known hotels near the strip. But for the 31st rendition, producers chose to convert a penthouse suite at the Gold Spike in Downtown Las Vegas. The 5,000-square-foot suite features 3 bedrooms, 3 rooftop patios, and the requisite pool table. It's available to rent by the night.

Season 32: Seattle (Currently Filming)

After heading back to other cities multiple times, it's now Seattle's turn to host the Real World for the second time. This time, the cast will live in up-and-coming Capitol Hill where the producers plan to spend $50,000 in alterations on the Ballou Wright building. Filming is currently underway.