clock menu more-arrow no yes
Beach Volleyball Arena on Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro on July 25, 2016.
Beach Volleyball Arena on Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro on July 25, 2016.
Michael Heiman/Getty Images

Every 2016 Olympic venue in Rio de Janeiro, mapped

More than 30 venues in five cities will be used during the 2016 Summer Olympics.

View as Map
Beach Volleyball Arena on Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro on July 25, 2016.
| Michael Heiman/Getty Images

The 2016 Rio Olympics are fast approaching, with the opening games occurring on August 5. Although there are reports of incomplete facilities, many of the stadiums and sporting locations are indeed finished—in fact, 15 of the venues already existed in some form.

With more than 30 locations spread over five different cities, this year's Olympics are incredibly expansive. To ease the navigation of this extraordinary event, or to give some geographic context as you spectate from your couch, we mapped every venue that will be used for the 2016 Rio Olympics.

While the stadiums for the soccer games are spread across the country, the venues within Rio are clustered in four areas: Barra Olympic Park will be the center of the games, with nine venues, plus the golf course and Olympic Village; The section in Deodoro, in the western part of the city, features five venues, including a new park area; the Copacabana zone will show off Rio's waterfront beauty, hosting beach volleyball, sailing, and other water sports; and the Maracanã area will host the opening and closing ceremonies, as well as soccer matches, in its eponymous stadium.

Points are ordered geographically, with sites in the four Olympic zones grouped together.

Read More

1. Corinthians Arena

Copy Link
Av. Miguel Ignácio Curi, 111 - Vila Carmosina, São Paulo - SP
08295-005, Brazil

Architect: Aníbal Coutinho

Year of construction: 2014

The Basics: The Corinthians Arena was built in 2014 for the FIFA World Cup and is located in the City of São Paulo, 400 kilometers southwest of Rio de Janeiro. The design itself incorporates ceramic tiles on the facade of the arena and 80 percent of the structural elements are prefabricated. During the 2016 Olympics, the arena will host group and quarter-final matches

2. Pontal

Copy Link
Rio de Janeiro
State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: The road cycling time trials and race walking competitions will be held at this temporary beachside facility.

3. Olympic Golf Course

Copy Link
Av. das Américas, 10033 - Recreio dos Bandeirantes
Rio de Janeiro - RJ, Brazil

Architect: Rua Arquitetos

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: For the first time since 1904, golf will return to the Olympics. The 18-hole Olympic Golf Course in Rio was constructed specifically for the 2016 games and features native landscaping. It will be open to the public following the Olympics.

4. Riocentro

Copy Link
Av. Salvador Allende, 6555, Rio de Janeiro
RJ 22780-160, Brazil
+55 21 2441-9100
Visit Website

Year of construction: 1977

The Basics: The Riocentro is the largest convention center in Latin America, and four of its pavilions will be used for Olympic events: weightlifting, table tennis, badminton, and boxing.

5. Olympic Aquatics Stadium

Copy Link
Av. Embaixador Abelardo Bueno, 3401 - Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
22775-040, Brazil

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: The Olympic Aquatics Stadium, a sustainably designed temporary structure, will host the swimming competitions and water polo finals. Like other temp structure, it employs "nomadic architecture," allowing it to be broken down and reused following the Olympics. The stadium design also incorporates a natural ventilation system: approximately 15,000 holes were drilled into the structure to allow unrestricted air flow. According to World Build 365, without this system, the building would need the equivalent of 10,000 household air-conditioners.

6. Future Arena

Copy Link
Av. Embaixador Abelardo Bueno, 3401 - Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
22775-040, Brazil

Architect:Lopes Santos & Ferreira Gomes + AndArchitects

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: The Future Arena is a temporary installation that will host the handball games. Following the Olympics, the wood and steel building will be dismantled and the materials will be used to construct four state schools.

7. Arena Carioca

Copy Link
Parque Olímpico da Barra - Av. Embaixador Abelardo Bueno, 3401, Barra da Tijuca
RJ, 22775-039

Architect: Arqhos Consultoria e Projetos

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: The Carioca Arenas are located within the Barra Olympic Park. These three stadiums are interlocked, providing some of the largest indoor spaces for the 2016 Rio Olympics and tens of thousands of seats for spectators. The Carioca Arenas will host a broad range of sports, including basketball, wrestling, judo, taekwondo, and fencing.

8. Olympic Tennis Centre

Copy Link
Av. Embaixador Abelardo Bueno, 3401 / 110 - Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
22775-039, Brazil

Architect: Blac Arquitetura

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: The construction of the Olympic Tennis Centre—a new permanent facility built specifically for the games—made headlines for its massive delays, and it may be one of the last venues to be 100 percent finished. A few of the 16 outer courts are temporary and will be removed after the games.

9. Rio Olympic Velodrome

Copy Link
Av. Embaixador Abelardo Bueno, 3401 - Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
22775-040, Brazil

Architect: Blac Arquitetura

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: Despite excessive delays (and fears that it would never be completed), the Rio Olympic Velodrome officially opened at the end of June, and athletes seem very pleased with it. It is located within the Barra Olympic Park, and it features a dramatic sloped roof which mimics the curvature of the interior race track. After the 2016 Olympics, the Velodrome will remain in use as a training facility for athletes.

10. Rio Olympic Arena

Copy Link
Av. Embaixador Abelardo Bueno, 3401 - Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
22775-040, Brazil

Architect: Lopes Santos & Ferreira Gomes

Year of construction: 2007

The Basics: Also known as the HSBC Arena, this facility will go by the Rio Olympic Arena during the games (no commercial names are allowed on Olympic venues). It was initially built for the 2007 Pan American Games and will serve as the home for the artistic, rhythmic, and trampoline gymnastic events.

11. Maria Lenk Aquatics Centre

Copy Link
Av. Embaixador Abelardo Bueno, 3401 - Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
22775-040, Brazil

Architect: Lopes Santos and Ferreira Gomes

Year of construction: 2007

The Basics: The Maria Lenk Aquatics Centre, named for a Brazilian swimmer, was initially constructed for the 2007 Pan American Games and contains two open air swimming pools and diving towers. For the 2016 Olympics, the partially-covered center will host diving, water polo, and synchronized swimming competitions

12. Lagoa Stadium

Copy Link
Av. Borges de Medeiros, 1524 - Lagoa
Rio de Janeiro - RJ, Brazil

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: Located on the Lagoa Rodrigo de Freitas, the Lagoa Stadium will serve as the stage for the canoe and rowing sprints. Although scenic, many aquatic athletes expressed concerns regarding extensive pollution of the lagoon and the danger it poses to competitors.

13. Fort Copacabana

Copy Link
Copacabana
Rio de Janeiro - State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: The historic Fort Copacabana will serve as starting point for open air competitions such as road cycling, marathon swimming, and triathlon events.

14. Beach Volleyball Arena

Copy Link
Av. Princesa Isabel - Copacabana, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
22011-010, Brazil

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: The Beach Volleyball Arena is located on Rio's famous Copacabana Beach, and it will be exclusively used for beach volleyball. The temporary structure officially opened on Tuesday, July 16; it will be disassembled following the Olympics.

15. Marina da Glória

Copy Link
Aterro do Flamengo - Av. Infante Dom Henrique, 10 - Glória
Rio de Janeiro - RJ, Brazil

Architect:Eduardo Mandolfo

Year of construction:2016

The Basics: Rio's stunning Marina da Glória will serve as the venue for the 2016 Olympic sailing competitions. Access to the marina was significantly restricted for the last decade as the area was revitalized and incorporated into the surrounding Flamengo Park. In preparation of the upcoming Olympics, a temporary facility and pier have been constructed.

16. Sambódromo

Copy Link
R. Mq. de Sapucaí, Rio de Janeiro
RJ 20210-070, Brazil

Architect: Oscar Niemeyer

Year of construction: 1984

The Basics: The Sambódromo was built for, and is still used as a permanent parade ground in the city of Rio de Janeiro. The parade grounds, best known for hosting Carnival festivities, extend for more than 2000 feet and can accommodate 90,000 spectators. For the Olympics, the venue will host the archery tournament and a stretch of the marathon.

17. Maracanãzinho

Copy Link
Maracanã
Rio de Janeiro - State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Architect:Rafael Galvão, Pedro Bastos, Orlando Azevedo, and Antônio Dias Carneiro

Year of construction: 1954

The Basics: Maracanãzinho Stadium was initially built in 1954 and underwent three different renovations in 2004, 2007, and 2016. It's largely used for volleyball, and during the Olympics, it will host the indoor volleyball matches. Athletes seem to love the storied venue.

18. Maracana Stadium

Copy Link
Maracanã - Av. Pres. Castelo Branco, 439-501 - Maracanã, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
20271-130, Brazil

Architect: Rafael Galvão, Pedro Paulo Bernardes Bastos, Orlando Azevedo, and Antônio Dias Carneiro

Year of construction: 1950

The Basics: The Maracana Stadium has seen a lot of action during its tenure. It was originally built for the 1950 FIFA World cup, later being used for the 1997 Pan American Games and the 2014 FIFA World Cup. In 2013, the stadium underwent extensive renovations which included the demolition of the pre existing concrete roof in favor of looped cable roof that resembles a spoked wheel. Maracana Stadium will play a key role during the 2016 Olympics, hosting the opening and closing ceremonies as well as decisive games for the football tournament.

19. Olympic Stadium

Copy Link
R. Arquias Cordeiro, 1100 - Engenho Novo
Rio de Janeiro - RJ, Brazil

Architect: Carlos Porto

Year of construction: 2007

The Basics: Known by several names, the Olympic Stadium was initially built for the 2007 Pan American Games, and is home to the Botafogo football team. During the Olympics, it will host the track and field events, as well as some soccer matches. The stadium had to be closed for two years for roof repairs, but don't worry, it now meets safety standards.

20. Olympic Equestrian Centre

Copy Link
R. Salustiano Silva, 928 - Magalhaes Bastos
Rio de Janeiro - RJ, Brazil

Architect: BCMF Arquitetos, Vigliecca and Associados

Year of construction: 2007, 2015

The Basics: The Olympic Equestrian Centre is located in the former National Equestrian Center which was constructed for the 2007 Pan American Games. The site will host jumping, eventing, and cross-country courses.

21. Olympic Hockey Centre

Copy Link
Estr. São Pedro de Alcântara, 2020 - Vila Militar, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
21615-435, Brazil

Architect: Vigliecca & Associados

Year of construction: 2007

The Basics: The Olympic Hockey Centre was constructed for the 2007 Pan American Games and has been renovated for the 2016 Olympics. After the 2016 Olympics, the site will be used as a training facility for the Brazilian national field hockey team.

22. Deodoro Stadium

Copy Link
Estr. São Pedro de Alcântara, 2020 - Vila Militar, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
21615-435, Brazil

Architect:Vigliecca and Associados

Year of construction:2016

The Basics: Constructed around a preexisting polo field, the temporary Deodoro Stadium will serve as the Olympic venue for the rugby tournament, and the equestrian, running, and shooting sections of the modern pentathlon.

23. Olympic Shooting Centre

Copy Link
Deodoro
Rio de Janeiro - State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Architect: BCMF Arquitetos(2007), Vigliecca and Associados(2016)

Year of construction: 2007, 2016

The Basics: The seven shooting ranges that make up the Olympic Shooting Centre were originally built in 2007 for the Pan American Games, but the facility saw some upgrades in advance of the Olympics, and an additional temporary range was added.

24. Youth Arena

Copy Link
Estr. São Pedro de Alcântara, 2020 - Vila Militar, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
21615-435, Brazil

Architect: Vigliecca and Associados

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: With its sleek modernist lines, the Youth Arena is an understated addition to Rio's landscape. The key challenge in designing the facility was that is needed to accommodate two very different sports—women's basketball and fencing for the modern pentathlon. The building is quipped with natural ventilation, large shading areas on the facade, and other features that reduce maintenance costs.

25. Mountain Bike Centre

Copy Link
Estr. Mal. Alencastro, 1357 - Ricardo de Albuquerque, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
21625-000, Brazil

Architect: Vigliecca and Associados

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: This 5,400-meter long track located within Rio's new Parque Radical at the Deodoro Sports Complex will be utilized for mountain cycling during the Olympic games.

26. Whitewater Stadium

Copy Link
Estr. Mal. Alencastro, 1357 - Ricardo de Albuquerque, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
21615-320, Brazil

Architect: Vigliecca and Associados

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: One of the more complex new developments for the Olympics, the Whitewater Stadium contains 25 million liters of water and courses for both training and competition. The variations in the Whitewater Stadium rapids are created through cast-in-place concrete molds as well as the natural slope of the site itself.

27. Olympic BMX Centre

Copy Link
Estr. Mal. Alencastro, 1357 - Ricardo de Albuquerque, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
21625-000, Brazil

Architect: Vigliecca and Associados

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: The Olympic BMX Centre is a 4,000 square meter site located within the new Radical Park and will be used for BMX cycle runs. The Radical Park is over 500,000 square meters and will be the second largest public park in Rio de Janeiro following the Olympics.

28. Mineirão Stadium

Copy Link
São José
Belo Horizonte - MG, Brazil

Architect: Eduardo Mendes Guimarães Júnior + Gaspar Garreto (1965) BCMF Arquitetos (2012)

Year of construction: 1965, 2012

The Basics: This stadium was opened in 1965, and, like many other Brazilian venues, was renovated in 2014 for the FIFA World Cup. The concrete canopy crowning the stadium has been blanketed in solar panels that have the capacity to provide electricity to 1,200 homes in the surrounding neighborhood. During the 2016 Olympics, Mineirão will be used for group games, semi-finals, and quarter-finals during the soccer tournament.

29. Mané Garrincha Stadium

Copy Link
Asa Norte, Brasília - DF
70070-701, Brazil

Architect: Ícaro de Castro Mello (1974), Castro Mello Arquitetos, GMP Architekten, Schlaich Bergermann Partner (2013)

Year of construction: 1974, 2013

The Basics: The Mane Garrincha Stadium, originally built in 1974, was refurbished and expanded for the 2014 FIFA World Cup. During the Olympics, it will host group-matches and quarter-finals. Some 218 concrete pillars encircle the stadium, and the Oscar Niemeyer-inspired design fits seamlessly with the modernist masterplan of Brasilia. With a price tag of $900M, it is the second most expensive stadium in the world.

30. Fonte Nova Arena

Copy Link
Ladeira da Fonte das Pedras - Nazaré
Salvador - BA, Brazil

Architect: Marc Duwe and Claas Schulitz

Year of construction: 2013

The Basics: Built for the 2014 FIFA World Cup, the Fonte Nova Arena replaced an older stadium that stood on the same site since 1951. It will be used during the 2016 Olympics for group stage matches as well as two quarter-finals. The design of the stadium is astonishingly open, providing ample air flow and sweeping views of the city of Salvador.

31. Amazônia Arena

Copy Link
Av. Djalma Batista, 3637 - Flores, Manaus - AM
69050-010, Brazil

Architect: Gmp Architekten

Year of construction: 2014

The Basics:The Amazonia Arena was built for the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Amazon rain forest in the heart of Brazil, and it will host six football matches, four men's and two women's, during the group stage of the Olympic gavmes. The arena is enveloped by a lattice-like screen supported by metal girders, providing shade, as well as protecting the structure from the Amazon's tropical elements.

1. Corinthians Arena

Av. Miguel Ignácio Curi, 111 - Vila Carmosina, São Paulo - SP, 08295-005, Brazil

Architect: Aníbal Coutinho

Year of construction: 2014

The Basics: The Corinthians Arena was built in 2014 for the FIFA World Cup and is located in the City of São Paulo, 400 kilometers southwest of Rio de Janeiro. The design itself incorporates ceramic tiles on the facade of the arena and 80 percent of the structural elements are prefabricated. During the 2016 Olympics, the arena will host group and quarter-final matches

Av. Miguel Ignácio Curi, 111 - Vila Carmosina, São Paulo - SP
08295-005, Brazil

2. Pontal

Rio de Janeiro, State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: The road cycling time trials and race walking competitions will be held at this temporary beachside facility.

Rio de Janeiro
State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

3. Olympic Golf Course

Av. das Américas, 10033 - Recreio dos Bandeirantes, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, Brazil

Architect: Rua Arquitetos

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: For the first time since 1904, golf will return to the Olympics. The 18-hole Olympic Golf Course in Rio was constructed specifically for the 2016 games and features native landscaping. It will be open to the public following the Olympics.

Av. das Américas, 10033 - Recreio dos Bandeirantes
Rio de Janeiro - RJ, Brazil

4. Riocentro

Av. Salvador Allende, 6555, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22780-160, Brazil

Year of construction: 1977

The Basics: The Riocentro is the largest convention center in Latin America, and four of its pavilions will be used for Olympic events: weightlifting, table tennis, badminton, and boxing.

Av. Salvador Allende, 6555, Rio de Janeiro
RJ 22780-160, Brazil

5. Olympic Aquatics Stadium

Av. Embaixador Abelardo Bueno, 3401 - Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 22775-040, Brazil

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: The Olympic Aquatics Stadium, a sustainably designed temporary structure, will host the swimming competitions and water polo finals. Like other temp structure, it employs "nomadic architecture," allowing it to be broken down and reused following the Olympics. The stadium design also incorporates a natural ventilation system: approximately 15,000 holes were drilled into the structure to allow unrestricted air flow. According to World Build 365, without this system, the building would need the equivalent of 10,000 household air-conditioners.

Av. Embaixador Abelardo Bueno, 3401 - Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
22775-040, Brazil

6. Future Arena

Av. Embaixador Abelardo Bueno, 3401 - Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 22775-040, Brazil

Architect:Lopes Santos & Ferreira Gomes + AndArchitects

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: The Future Arena is a temporary installation that will host the handball games. Following the Olympics, the wood and steel building will be dismantled and the materials will be used to construct four state schools.

Av. Embaixador Abelardo Bueno, 3401 - Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
22775-040, Brazil

7. Arena Carioca

Parque Olímpico da Barra - Av. Embaixador Abelardo Bueno, 3401, Barra da Tijuca, RJ, 22775-039

Architect: Arqhos Consultoria e Projetos

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: The Carioca Arenas are located within the Barra Olympic Park. These three stadiums are interlocked, providing some of the largest indoor spaces for the 2016 Rio Olympics and tens of thousands of seats for spectators. The Carioca Arenas will host a broad range of sports, including basketball, wrestling, judo, taekwondo, and fencing.

Parque Olímpico da Barra - Av. Embaixador Abelardo Bueno, 3401, Barra da Tijuca
RJ, 22775-039

8. Olympic Tennis Centre

Av. Embaixador Abelardo Bueno, 3401 / 110 - Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 22775-039, Brazil

Architect: Blac Arquitetura

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: The construction of the Olympic Tennis Centre—a new permanent facility built specifically for the games—made headlines for its massive delays, and it may be one of the last venues to be 100 percent finished. A few of the 16 outer courts are temporary and will be removed after the games.

Av. Embaixador Abelardo Bueno, 3401 / 110 - Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
22775-039, Brazil

9. Rio Olympic Velodrome

Av. Embaixador Abelardo Bueno, 3401 - Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 22775-040, Brazil

Architect: Blac Arquitetura

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: Despite excessive delays (and fears that it would never be completed), the Rio Olympic Velodrome officially opened at the end of June, and athletes seem very pleased with it. It is located within the Barra Olympic Park, and it features a dramatic sloped roof which mimics the curvature of the interior race track. After the 2016 Olympics, the Velodrome will remain in use as a training facility for athletes.

Av. Embaixador Abelardo Bueno, 3401 - Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
22775-040, Brazil

10. Rio Olympic Arena

Av. Embaixador Abelardo Bueno, 3401 - Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 22775-040, Brazil

Architect: Lopes Santos & Ferreira Gomes

Year of construction: 2007

The Basics: Also known as the HSBC Arena, this facility will go by the Rio Olympic Arena during the games (no commercial names are allowed on Olympic venues). It was initially built for the 2007 Pan American Games and will serve as the home for the artistic, rhythmic, and trampoline gymnastic events.

Av. Embaixador Abelardo Bueno, 3401 - Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
22775-040, Brazil

11. Maria Lenk Aquatics Centre

Av. Embaixador Abelardo Bueno, 3401 - Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 22775-040, Brazil

Architect: Lopes Santos and Ferreira Gomes

Year of construction: 2007

The Basics: The Maria Lenk Aquatics Centre, named for a Brazilian swimmer, was initially constructed for the 2007 Pan American Games and contains two open air swimming pools and diving towers. For the 2016 Olympics, the partially-covered center will host diving, water polo, and synchronized swimming competitions

Av. Embaixador Abelardo Bueno, 3401 - Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
22775-040, Brazil

12. Lagoa Stadium

Av. Borges de Medeiros, 1524 - Lagoa, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, Brazil

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: Located on the Lagoa Rodrigo de Freitas, the Lagoa Stadium will serve as the stage for the canoe and rowing sprints. Although scenic, many aquatic athletes expressed concerns regarding extensive pollution of the lagoon and the danger it poses to competitors.

Av. Borges de Medeiros, 1524 - Lagoa
Rio de Janeiro - RJ, Brazil

13. Fort Copacabana

Copacabana, Rio de Janeiro - State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: The historic Fort Copacabana will serve as starting point for open air competitions such as road cycling, marathon swimming, and triathlon events.

Copacabana
Rio de Janeiro - State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

14. Beach Volleyball Arena

Av. Princesa Isabel - Copacabana, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 22011-010, Brazil

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: The Beach Volleyball Arena is located on Rio's famous Copacabana Beach, and it will be exclusively used for beach volleyball. The temporary structure officially opened on Tuesday, July 16; it will be disassembled following the Olympics.

Av. Princesa Isabel - Copacabana, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
22011-010, Brazil

15. Marina da Glória

Aterro do Flamengo - Av. Infante Dom Henrique, 10 - Glória, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, Brazil

Architect:Eduardo Mandolfo

Year of construction:2016

The Basics: Rio's stunning Marina da Glória will serve as the venue for the 2016 Olympic sailing competitions. Access to the marina was significantly restricted for the last decade as the area was revitalized and incorporated into the surrounding Flamengo Park. In preparation of the upcoming Olympics, a temporary facility and pier have been constructed.

Aterro do Flamengo - Av. Infante Dom Henrique, 10 - Glória
Rio de Janeiro - RJ, Brazil

16. Sambódromo

R. Mq. de Sapucaí, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20210-070, Brazil

Architect: Oscar Niemeyer

Year of construction: 1984

The Basics: The Sambódromo was built for, and is still used as a permanent parade ground in the city of Rio de Janeiro. The parade grounds, best known for hosting Carnival festivities, extend for more than 2000 feet and can accommodate 90,000 spectators. For the Olympics, the venue will host the archery tournament and a stretch of the marathon.

R. Mq. de Sapucaí, Rio de Janeiro
RJ 20210-070, Brazil

17. Maracanãzinho

Maracanã, Rio de Janeiro - State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Architect:Rafael Galvão, Pedro Bastos, Orlando Azevedo, and Antônio Dias Carneiro

Year of construction: 1954

The Basics: Maracanãzinho Stadium was initially built in 1954 and underwent three different renovations in 2004, 2007, and 2016. It's largely used for volleyball, and during the Olympics, it will host the indoor volleyball matches. Athletes seem to love the storied venue.

Maracanã
Rio de Janeiro - State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

18. Maracana Stadium

Maracanã - Av. Pres. Castelo Branco, 439-501 - Maracanã, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 20271-130, Brazil

Architect: Rafael Galvão, Pedro Paulo Bernardes Bastos, Orlando Azevedo, and Antônio Dias Carneiro

Year of construction: 1950

The Basics: The Maracana Stadium has seen a lot of action during its tenure. It was originally built for the 1950 FIFA World cup, later being used for the 1997 Pan American Games and the 2014 FIFA World Cup. In 2013, the stadium underwent extensive renovations which included the demolition of the pre existing concrete roof in favor of looped cable roof that resembles a spoked wheel. Maracana Stadium will play a key role during the 2016 Olympics, hosting the opening and closing ceremonies as well as decisive games for the football tournament.

Maracanã - Av. Pres. Castelo Branco, 439-501 - Maracanã, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
20271-130, Brazil

19. Olympic Stadium

R. Arquias Cordeiro, 1100 - Engenho Novo, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, Brazil

Architect: Carlos Porto

Year of construction: 2007

The Basics: Known by several names, the Olympic Stadium was initially built for the 2007 Pan American Games, and is home to the Botafogo football team. During the Olympics, it will host the track and field events, as well as some soccer matches. The stadium had to be closed for two years for roof repairs, but don't worry, it now meets safety standards.

R. Arquias Cordeiro, 1100 - Engenho Novo
Rio de Janeiro - RJ, Brazil

20. Olympic Equestrian Centre

R. Salustiano Silva, 928 - Magalhaes Bastos, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, Brazil

Architect: BCMF Arquitetos, Vigliecca and Associados

Year of construction: 2007, 2015

The Basics: The Olympic Equestrian Centre is located in the former National Equestrian Center which was constructed for the 2007 Pan American Games. The site will host jumping, eventing, and cross-country courses.

R. Salustiano Silva, 928 - Magalhaes Bastos
Rio de Janeiro - RJ, Brazil

21. Olympic Hockey Centre

Estr. São Pedro de Alcântara, 2020 - Vila Militar, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 21615-435, Brazil

Architect: Vigliecca & Associados

Year of construction: 2007

The Basics: The Olympic Hockey Centre was constructed for the 2007 Pan American Games and has been renovated for the 2016 Olympics. After the 2016 Olympics, the site will be used as a training facility for the Brazilian national field hockey team.

Estr. São Pedro de Alcântara, 2020 - Vila Militar, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
21615-435, Brazil

22. Deodoro Stadium

Estr. São Pedro de Alcântara, 2020 - Vila Militar, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 21615-435, Brazil

Architect:Vigliecca and Associados

Year of construction:2016

The Basics: Constructed around a preexisting polo field, the temporary Deodoro Stadium will serve as the Olympic venue for the rugby tournament, and the equestrian, running, and shooting sections of the modern pentathlon.

Estr. São Pedro de Alcântara, 2020 - Vila Militar, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
21615-435, Brazil

23. Olympic Shooting Centre

Deodoro, Rio de Janeiro - State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Architect: BCMF Arquitetos(2007), Vigliecca and Associados(2016)

Year of construction: 2007, 2016

The Basics: The seven shooting ranges that make up the Olympic Shooting Centre were originally built in 2007 for the Pan American Games, but the facility saw some upgrades in advance of the Olympics, and an additional temporary range was added.

Deodoro
Rio de Janeiro - State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

24. Youth Arena

Estr. São Pedro de Alcântara, 2020 - Vila Militar, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 21615-435, Brazil

Architect: Vigliecca and Associados

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: With its sleek modernist lines, the Youth Arena is an understated addition to Rio's landscape. The key challenge in designing the facility was that is needed to accommodate two very different sports—women's basketball and fencing for the modern pentathlon. The building is quipped with natural ventilation, large shading areas on the facade, and other features that reduce maintenance costs.

Estr. São Pedro de Alcântara, 2020 - Vila Militar, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
21615-435, Brazil

25. Mountain Bike Centre

Estr. Mal. Alencastro, 1357 - Ricardo de Albuquerque, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 21625-000, Brazil

Architect: Vigliecca and Associados

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: This 5,400-meter long track located within Rio's new Parque Radical at the Deodoro Sports Complex will be utilized for mountain cycling during the Olympic games.

Estr. Mal. Alencastro, 1357 - Ricardo de Albuquerque, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
21625-000, Brazil

26. Whitewater Stadium

Estr. Mal. Alencastro, 1357 - Ricardo de Albuquerque, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 21615-320, Brazil

Architect: Vigliecca and Associados

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: One of the more complex new developments for the Olympics, the Whitewater Stadium contains 25 million liters of water and courses for both training and competition. The variations in the Whitewater Stadium rapids are created through cast-in-place concrete molds as well as the natural slope of the site itself.

Estr. Mal. Alencastro, 1357 - Ricardo de Albuquerque, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
21615-320, Brazil

27. Olympic BMX Centre

Estr. Mal. Alencastro, 1357 - Ricardo de Albuquerque, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 21625-000, Brazil

Architect: Vigliecca and Associados

Year of construction: 2016

The Basics: The Olympic BMX Centre is a 4,000 square meter site located within the new Radical Park and will be used for BMX cycle runs. The Radical Park is over 500,000 square meters and will be the second largest public park in Rio de Janeiro following the Olympics.

Estr. Mal. Alencastro, 1357 - Ricardo de Albuquerque, Rio de Janeiro - RJ
21625-000, Brazil

28. Mineirão Stadium

São José, Belo Horizonte - MG, Brazil

Architect: Eduardo Mendes Guimarães Júnior + Gaspar Garreto (1965) BCMF Arquitetos (2012)

Year of construction: 1965, 2012

The Basics: This stadium was opened in 1965, and, like many other Brazilian venues, was renovated in 2014 for the FIFA World Cup. The concrete canopy crowning the stadium has been blanketed in solar panels that have the capacity to provide electricity to 1,200 homes in the surrounding neighborhood. During the 2016 Olympics, Mineirão will be used for group games, semi-finals, and quarter-finals during the soccer tournament.

São José
Belo Horizonte - MG, Brazil

29. Mané Garrincha Stadium

Asa Norte, Brasília - DF, 70070-701, Brazil

Architect: Ícaro de Castro Mello (1974), Castro Mello Arquitetos, GMP Architekten, Schlaich Bergermann Partner (2013)

Year of construction: 1974, 2013

The Basics: The Mane Garrincha Stadium, originally built in 1974, was refurbished and expanded for the 2014 FIFA World Cup. During the Olympics, it will host group-matches and quarter-finals. Some 218 concrete pillars encircle the stadium, and the Oscar Niemeyer-inspired design fits seamlessly with the modernist masterplan of Brasilia. With a price tag of $900M, it is the second most expensive stadium in the world.

Asa Norte, Brasília - DF
70070-701, Brazil

30. Fonte Nova Arena

Ladeira da Fonte das Pedras - Nazaré, Salvador - BA, Brazil

Architect: Marc Duwe and Claas Schulitz

Year of construction: 2013

The Basics: Built for the 2014 FIFA World Cup, the Fonte Nova Arena replaced an older stadium that stood on the same site since 1951. It will be used during the 2016 Olympics for group stage matches as well as two quarter-finals. The design of the stadium is astonishingly open, providing ample air flow and sweeping views of the city of Salvador.

Ladeira da Fonte das Pedras - Nazaré
Salvador - BA, Brazil

31. Amazônia Arena

Av. Djalma Batista, 3637 - Flores, Manaus - AM, 69050-010, Brazil

Architect: Gmp Architekten

Year of construction: 2014

The Basics:The Amazonia Arena was built for the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Amazon rain forest in the heart of Brazil, and it will host six football matches, four men's and two women's, during the group stage of the Olympic gavmes. The arena is enveloped by a lattice-like screen supported by metal girders, providing shade, as well as protecting the structure from the Amazon's tropical elements.

Av. Djalma Batista, 3637 - Flores, Manaus - AM
69050-010, Brazil