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Survive Doomsday With Cocktails at These Killer Hideouts

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Welcome to December, the last month the world will exist, according to some interpretations of the Mayan calendar. With T-minus 18 days until life as we know it is DUNZO, it's about time to finalize those apocalypse plans. While there are bound to be doomsday real estate deals aplenty floating around on Craigslist, the more intensely paranoid—not to mention obscenely wealthy—have a slew of chic, souped-up bunker options to choose from. Although it's unlikely that Los Angeles' hotly anticipated porn bunker will be built in time for Dec. 21, find below 10 of the most extravagant doomsday abodes with their own protective specialties and feel-good amenities. From underwater caverns and subterranean medical centers to alpine vessels that withstand extreme weather and old forts with 360-degree territory views, at least one of these over-the-top options is bound to see Dec. 22, right?


· All apocalypse-related coverage [Curbed National]

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Bomb Shelter Bachelor Pad

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In 1953, a contractor built himself a bachelor bunker in Hollywood. The home, as described in an LA Times article, had a swimming pool that was actually "an underwater tunnel leading to a sealed, underground cave aerated with oxygen tanks." See the old-timey rendering above, and read more about the home over at Curbed LA.

Villa Vals

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Villa Vals, the creation of designers Bjarne Mastenbroek and Christian Müller, is a vacation home burrowed in the hills of Vals, Switzerland. To get to the bunker, visitors must first find the entrance—actually a shed—and creep through the underground tunnel that cuts through the mountains. Bonus: the inside has a slick secret-agent vibe.

VIVOS UNDERGROUND SHELTER

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Here is the swankiest bunker of them all, Vivos corporation's massive underground shelter in Nebraska. Amenities at the four-star, disaster-ready hotel will include dental facilities, a bakery, a medical center, and even a prison. Here's what's odd: the location of the concrete-and-steel bunker will remain a mystery, even to the paying customers, until disaster occurs. (The address used for this map is that of the Nebraska's Department of Insurance.) Seems like the investors have a lot of faith that Vivos will be able to predict the exact time and place apocalyptic disaster will hit.

Georgia Manse With Bomb Shelter

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This six-bedroom manse, which was on the market last year in Alpharetta, Ga., has all the fixings for a well-heeled buyer: a chef's kitchen, a theater, a billiards room, and, obviously, a bomb shelter.

Modern Ark

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Over in China, the world's leader in crazy architecture, a man from Urumqi emptied his savings building a vessel that stands ready for the great flood. Sure, the decrepit-looking boat is missing the sheen of some other Ark-inspired architecture (see: the bobbing Ark Hotel) but this end-of-the-world-ready structure has the advantage of being, well, actually built.

Martello Tower Y

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During the Napoleonic wars, the Martello towers served as defensive safeholds. Now? It's still an effective way to fend off attackers, what with its 360-degree views and stone façade, but instead of a military fort, it's a modern family home, transformed by designer Duncan Jackson.

Waterwood Estate

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The abode of Don Brown, a wealthy and exceedingly paranoid man who died, oddly enough, in a plane crash, features 20 above-ground concrete pods as well as, of course, some 30,000 square feet of underground real estate. Yep, beneath that fastidiously manicured lawn are such doomsday necessities as a restaurant, a barber shop, and five bars. Brown, who made his fortune by inventing the drop ceiling, apparently also had trained Dobermans do a lap around the estate every hour. Just, you know, to be extra safe.

Refuge Gervasutti

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Refuge Gervasutti is an all-weather bullet-like vessel tucked into an alpine glacier near where the borders of Italy, France, and Switzerland meet. The unit was designed by LEAPfactory, which specializes in structures nearly impenetrable by the extreme cold. (Note: as its address is, well, nonexistent, a nearby hotel's address is listed instead.)

Survival Condo

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Much like the luxe underground digs being built in Nebraska, this fancy underground colonnade of condos brags a slew of amenities, including space for hydroponic and aquaculture food production, a library, a classroom, a medical center, and "redundant" water supply and air filtration. Another similarity? The company's keeping its true location under wraps—all they're giving away is that it's in Kansas.

The Elephant

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During the Cold War, Sweden's proximity to Russia meant a lot of bomb shelters and doomsday bunkers beneath the icy streets of its cities. For this bunker in Sollentuna, Swedish intelligence brought in an abundance of primary colors meant to bring cheer to a windowless compound, though the result was perhaps more aptly described by Oobject as "Ikea in Hell."

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Bomb Shelter Bachelor Pad

In 1953, a contractor built himself a bachelor bunker in Hollywood. The home, as described in an LA Times article, had a swimming pool that was actually "an underwater tunnel leading to a sealed, underground cave aerated with oxygen tanks." See the old-timey rendering above, and read more about the home over at Curbed LA.

Villa Vals

Villa Vals, the creation of designers Bjarne Mastenbroek and Christian Müller, is a vacation home burrowed in the hills of Vals, Switzerland. To get to the bunker, visitors must first find the entrance—actually a shed—and creep through the underground tunnel that cuts through the mountains. Bonus: the inside has a slick secret-agent vibe.

VIVOS UNDERGROUND SHELTER

Here is the swankiest bunker of them all, Vivos corporation's massive underground shelter in Nebraska. Amenities at the four-star, disaster-ready hotel will include dental facilities, a bakery, a medical center, and even a prison. Here's what's odd: the location of the concrete-and-steel bunker will remain a mystery, even to the paying customers, until disaster occurs. (The address used for this map is that of the Nebraska's Department of Insurance.) Seems like the investors have a lot of faith that Vivos will be able to predict the exact time and place apocalyptic disaster will hit.

Georgia Manse With Bomb Shelter

This six-bedroom manse, which was on the market last year in Alpharetta, Ga., has all the fixings for a well-heeled buyer: a chef's kitchen, a theater, a billiards room, and, obviously, a bomb shelter.

Modern Ark

Over in China, the world's leader in crazy architecture, a man from Urumqi emptied his savings building a vessel that stands ready for the great flood. Sure, the decrepit-looking boat is missing the sheen of some other Ark-inspired architecture (see: the bobbing Ark Hotel) but this end-of-the-world-ready structure has the advantage of being, well, actually built.

Martello Tower Y

During the Napoleonic wars, the Martello towers served as defensive safeholds. Now? It's still an effective way to fend off attackers, what with its 360-degree views and stone façade, but instead of a military fort, it's a modern family home, transformed by designer Duncan Jackson.

Waterwood Estate

The abode of Don Brown, a wealthy and exceedingly paranoid man who died, oddly enough, in a plane crash, features 20 above-ground concrete pods as well as, of course, some 30,000 square feet of underground real estate. Yep, beneath that fastidiously manicured lawn are such doomsday necessities as a restaurant, a barber shop, and five bars. Brown, who made his fortune by inventing the drop ceiling, apparently also had trained Dobermans do a lap around the estate every hour. Just, you know, to be extra safe.

Refuge Gervasutti

Refuge Gervasutti is an all-weather bullet-like vessel tucked into an alpine glacier near where the borders of Italy, France, and Switzerland meet. The unit was designed by LEAPfactory, which specializes in structures nearly impenetrable by the extreme cold. (Note: as its address is, well, nonexistent, a nearby hotel's address is listed instead.)

Survival Condo

Much like the luxe underground digs being built in Nebraska, this fancy underground colonnade of condos brags a slew of amenities, including space for hydroponic and aquaculture food production, a library, a classroom, a medical center, and "redundant" water supply and air filtration. Another similarity? The company's keeping its true location under wraps—all they're giving away is that it's in Kansas.

The Elephant

During the Cold War, Sweden's proximity to Russia meant a lot of bomb shelters and doomsday bunkers beneath the icy streets of its cities. For this bunker in Sollentuna, Swedish intelligence brought in an abundance of primary colors meant to bring cheer to a windowless compound, though the result was perhaps more aptly described by Oobject as "Ikea in Hell."